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2017 French Presidential Election Round 1


Bruce

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Election Schedule

September 11: Signups Close
September 14: Round 1 Campaigning
September 16: Round 1 Results
September 18: Round 2 Campaigning
September 20: Round 2 Results

 

To request to lead one of the political parties in the election, complete this form and submit it as a reply to this thread. Note that applications are hidden until after the deadline and you may not receive your first choice. There will only be 1 player per party.

Quote

Character Name: (Your candidate's name. Must be a fictional character of your design)

Top 3 Party Choices: (See the available parties below. Please choose 3 as you may not receive your top choice.)

Campaign Platform Plans: (Use this to prove you will be able to lead the party realistically.)


Previous Job: 
Date of Birth: 
Race / Ethnicity: 
Religion: 
Wealth: 
Gender: 
Sexuality: 
Are you married?: 
How many children do you have?: 


Detailed Bio (optional)

 

During each campaigning phase, each candidate will be asked to write approximately a half dozen long-form answers to town-hall style questions. These will be graded for realism, creativity, and oratory skill to determine the election results.

Round 1 will consist of all candidates. After Round 1 results, the top 2 candidates enter the runoff Round 2 election. Campaigning in each round is in the same format.

The winner will be given the opportunity to play as the President of France with a multi. Note that the typical limitation of only playing in one country unless you subscribe as a Supporter is waved as this is considered a minigame and the requirements of governing the country will be minimal.

This minigame, consistent with the rest of GPS, is English only. Players are permitted to communicate in French if they prefer, but each post would also need to include an English translation.

 

Political Parties
(ranked highest to lowest polling)
Party Ideology
The Republicans (LR) Center-Right
Socialist Party (PS) Center-Left
Forward! (REM) Center-Left
National Front (FN) Far-Right
Untamed France (FI) Far-Left
France Arise (DLF) Far-Right
Communist Union (LO) Far-Left
Popular Republican Union (UPR) Far-Right
Democratic Movement (MD) Center-Right
The Greens (EELV) Center-Left
New Anticapitalist Party (NPA) Far-Left
Solidarity & Progress (S&P) Far-Left
Independent Any

 

 

Any questions? 

 

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Character Name: Georges Lafayette 

Top 3 Party Choices: the republicans, national front, France arise 

Campaign Platform Plans: I will bring the power back to the people by fighting the EU and making France a sovereign nation once again. I will fix the economy and and put France first (thanks DJT). (Ooc) I love France and being from there I believe I am the best fit for it. 


Previous Job: Mayor of Paris, member of the Senate 
Date of Birth: 1/24/1986 (33)
Race / Ethnicity: white
Religion: Catholic 
Wealth: upper class
Gender: male 
Sexuality: heterosexual 
Are you married?: yes
How many children do you have?: 1


Detailed Bio (optional)

Georges was born and raised in Lyon by two wealthy parents. He graduated from oxford with a degree in Law and was elected Mayor of Paris at age 24. He was then elected to the French Senate at age 29 after his mayoral term was up. He is married with a daughter and is a very large player in French Politics. 

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Character Name: Edouard Genevard-Cousteau

Top 3 Party Choices: REM, PS, LR

Campaign Platform Plans: 

REM - Less economic regulation, more nuclear power plants, support for the EU, lots of support for NATO, deficit and debt reduction, free trade, promoting French influence in the EU against Germany, anti-corruption, scrap the wealth tax, anti-Russia

PS - More protectionism, support for EU and NATO, anti-corruption, fix the budget, speed up asylum process and deportation but fund better housing, anti-Russia

LR - restricting legal immigration and asylum, euro-skepticism, empower police and military against terrorism, anti-free trade, pull French troops out of areas that they aren't being effective in, meh-Russia

Previous Job: Politician 
Date of Birth: October 11, 1959
Race / Ethnicity: White
Religion: Catholicism 
Wealth: Upper Class
Gender: Male 
Sexuality: Heterosexual 
Are you married?: Yes
How many children do you have?: 3

Detailed Bio (optional)

Christopher Drake

Republican, NY-2

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives

Former Chief Administrator - Rounds 4 & 5, Evil Arch-Conservative, Frequent Republican Player

 

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Character Name: Norbert Mathias Judicaël Daniau

Top 3 Party Choices: France Arise, Independent, National Front

Campaign Platform Plans: Remove France from the EU, Promote the idea of Wallonia to secede from Belgium to join France (Rattachism), Leave the Eurozone and return to the Franc, Pull back involvement with NATO and the UN, install more tariffs against Countries like China and others with a history of human rights violations and currency manipulation


Previous Job: Député of the National Assembly
Date of Birth: June 10th 1980 (37)
Race / Ethnicity: Cacausan 
Religion: Christian
Wealth: Upper Class
Gender: Male
Sexuality: Straight
Are you married?: Engaged
How many children do you have?: 0

Hartland: The Purification is Coming soon to a Theater near you

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Character Name: Jean-Paul Argent

Top 3 Party Choices: National Front (FN), France Arise (DLF), Popular Republican Union (UPR)

Campaign Platform Plans:

  • Campaign slogan: "Neither right nor left -- forward for France!"
  • Withdraw France from the euro and hold a referendum on EU membership, supporting the campaign to leave.
  • If the referendum result is to leave the EU, broker a deal to maintain French access to the single market (soft Frexit).
  • Reject the post-Cold War unipolar status quo and reassert France's role as a Great Power in world affairs.
  • Exercise France's power as a permanent member of the UN Security Council for French rather than U.S. or European interests.
  • Establish an expert commission to analyze the effect of post-Cold War membership in NATO on French interests.
  • Reset French relations with Russia and resist the U.S.-backed Second Cold War being waged through economic sanctions.
  • Reposition France as a neutral broker for peace in Ukraine, advocating federalism with generous provision for regional autonomy.
  • Reset French relations with Israel in recognition that it is the only functional liberal democracy in the region.
  • Provide diplomatic and financial support to the Peace at Home Council in Turkey, and insist on free and fair Turkish elections.
  • Absent significant constitutional reform, continue to oppose Turkish admission to the EU while France remains an EU member.
  • Bring the parties back to the table to negotiate stricter provisions in the Iran nuclear deal that will ensure Iranian compliance.
  • End French military intervention in the Syrian civil war and work toward a peaceful resolution with the Assad government.
  • Impose a net legal immigration rate of 10,000, and temporarily halt migration from high risk countries in the Middle East and Africa.
  • Prohibit dual citizenship in France for citizens of non-European countries.
  • Promote women's rights and assimilation by expanding the 2010 law banning public face covering to religious head covering.
  • Pass strict protections against religious discrimination that targets women, LGBT, Jewish, and other at-risk populations in France.
  • Enhance educational and outreach campaigns to promote the assimilation of Islamic migrants and combat Islamism.
  • Protect French industry and jobs against the negative effects of globalization with better trade deals and appropriate tariffs.
  • Preserve the French ideals of equality and fraternity by protecting the social safety net against globalist rollbacks.

Previous Job: 

  • Commandant in the French Army (highest rank achieved)
  • Member of the European Parliament
  • Member of the National Assembly (current)

Date of Birth: April 14, 1974
Race / Ethnicity: White/French
Religion: Catholic
Wealth: Upper Middle Class
Gender: Male
Sexuality: Heterosexual
Are you married?: Yes
How many children do you have?: 4

Senator Holly Hawthorne (R-AK)

@HollyHawthorne | Join the Freedom Caucus!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Character Name: Michel Le Blanc

Top 3 Party Choices: FN, DLF, UPR (in that order)

Campaign Platform Plans: Crack down on immigration, reinforce the national pension system, invest in infrastructure 


Previous Job: Corporate executive
Date of Birth: July 20, 1970
Race / Ethnicity: White/French
Religion: Traditionalist Catholic 
Wealth: Upper Class 
Gender: Male
Sexuality: Heterosexual 
Are you married?: Yes
How many children do you have?: Six

Andrew Byrd (and family), Virginia

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Starting Polls

  1. Lafayette (LR): 30%
  2. Cousteau (REM): 25%
  3. Argent (FN): 20%
  4. Daniau (IND): 15%
  5. Le Blanc (DLF): 10%

Analysis

  • There's a lot of competition on the right wing. 
  • Three of the five candidates are younger than 45.
  • Four of the five candidates are from the upper class. The other candidate is upper-middle class. The lower classes have taken notice and are coming into the election with a certain amount of skepticism.
  • Overall I'm impressed and appreciative of the level of research and effort you guys have done so far. Keep it up, it will pay off.
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In Round 1 of the election, all candidates are asked to debate the following questions. I will unhide your posts as quickly as possible to allow candidates to respond to one another. Debating concludes completely tomorrow night at 11:59PM. Don't wait until the deadline to post your answers. Those who actively participate in back-and-forth debate will tend to fair better.

  1. One of the most important issues to voters in this election is the high rate of unemployment in France which consistently is higher than other European countries, particularly among younger citizens. How will you solve this problem?
  2. Last year the British people rejected a referendum to leave the European Union. There have been similar calls in France and this has even become a central point of several candidates for President. Do you support it? Why or why not? 
  3. As recently as a year and a half ago we were all reminded how vulnerable France remains to terrorist attacks. As President, how will you protect the French people from future attacks?
  4. How should France approach the civil war in Turkey? 
  5. How will you address issues of global warming?
  6. A 2010 poll found that 2 in 3 French people support the French-speaking region of Belgium (Wallonia) leaving Belgium and joining France. This idea has even become a key component of Mr. Daniau's campaign. Is this a movement that you support? Why or why not?

@DTMvikings @SWMissourian @Brady @Steven Andrews @Batman

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1. One of the most important issues to voters in this election is the high rate of unemployment in France which consistently is higher than other European countries, particularly among younger citizens. How will you solve this problem?

Unemployment is one of the most serious challenges we face. The first thing we have to acknowledge is we're not going to get anywhere if we lurch left or swerve right -- what we need to do is simply move forward for France. What does that mean? It means we have to take the best ideas from both left and right, or from sources that are neither, and put them together to come up with a comprehensive solution.

We have to start by telling the truth about our underlying problems. We not only have a high unemployment rate, we also have jobs to spare. Why the mismatch? It's because we're suffering from a skills gap, we have people who need jobs but don't have the skills to do the jobs that are available. I'm not just talking about jobs in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, though we do need to better cultivate those skills. We're seeing a lack of skilled workers even for jobs that are accessible without the need for years more education. On top of that, we're seeing a lack of housing in the areas where these jobs are available. If French workers don't have the skills to do these jobs and can't live where these jobs are located, they can't do these jobs. So this is not just an unemployment problem, it's an education problem and a housing problem. We need to take a page from our Nordic friends and overhaul our education system to emphasize lifelong learning for the skills we'll need tomorrow. We also need to put more resources into affordable housing in the areas jobs are available. There's a little truth-telling from the left. But the right has something to say as well.

We're making it too easy for French workers to be complacent about unemployment. We have to make sure our unemployment system provides the necessary safety net for those who are out of work, but it can't be a long-term alternative to work. We can't have workers turning down jobs, but employers are seeing that happening. It's clear we need reform, which will have to include reducing both the amount and the length of unemployment benefits. What I propose is a progressive reduction in benefits over time, to encourage workers to be proactive about finding work without sending too much of a shock through the system. Aside from that, we need to be honest that this is a problem with our migration policy. Last year the number of unemployed migrants was almost double the number of unemployed Frenchmen. That's a problem of assimilation -- a skills gap, a language gap, a culture gap -- and it's a problem that can only be solved by reducing migration and imposing more stringent assimilation requirements.

2. Last year the British people rejected a referendum to leave the European Union. There have been similar calls in France and this has even become a central point of several candidates for President. Do you support it? Why or why not?

I do support a referendum, for two reasons. First, France must always be committed to our republican principles of liberty, equality, and fraternity, and those principles require us from time to time to consult free Frenchmen in equal measure regarding the future of France, trusting in our brothers and sisters to make the right decision, come what may. We must be brave, we must be bold, and we must not shy away from our duty to let Frenchmen determine the future of France because their choices may be challenging. A referendum is our duty to the French people.

I also support a referendum because I strongly believe France would be stronger both at home and in securing our vital interests abroad if we parted ways with the European Union. What we're increasingly seeing is a shift away from national decisions being made by national populations and their representatives, in favor of decisions being imposed by distant EU bureaucrats who put amorphous, supposedly European interests ahead of each nation's interests. The truth is in many cases these aren't even European interests being pursued, they're the interests of the bureaucrats and the EU administrative state, the cosmopolitan interests of the so-called "citizens of the world." Efforts have been made to reverse this trend in the EU, but those efforts have not been strong enough or well enough coordinated, and they haven't yielded results. I believe it's time to leave the EU and return to pursuing France's interests, in migration, in trade, in matters great and small, domestic and foreign. Should my fellow Frenchmen disagree with me, at the very least a referendum will deliver the message to the EU that change must come. A referendum is a win-win.

3. As recently as a year and a half ago we were all reminded how vulnerable France remains to terrorist attacks. As President, how will you protect the French people from future attacks?

Restraining migration and encouraging assimilation are the two vital components. I've proposed a strict net legal migration rate of 10,000 -- we simply must stop taking in migrants faster than they can be assimilated into French culture. I have also proposed completely halting migration from high risk countries in the Middle East and Africa, countries which are frankly the homelands of terror. We also need to pass strict new laws prohibiting religious discrimination against women, against Jews, against LGBT and other at-risk populations, because we need to send an unequivocal message that France values religious pluralism and secular protections against discrimination. Finally, we need to enhance our educational and outreach campaigns to promote assimilation of migrant populations. The best way to do this is through our schools, and we need to ensure French schools are teaching French values. Diversity must be respected, but the timeless values of Frenchmen must unite us in our diversity.

4. How should France approach the civil war in Turkey?

We should approach the Turkish civil war as we should approach all matters of international relations, with French interests firmly in mind. It is quite simply not in French interests to see restoration of the Islamist Erdogan regime, which has eroded important secular values in Turkey and reoriented Turkey away from Europe and toward Islamic radicalism. France should unequivocally support the Peace at Home Council, and we must insist on free and fair elections for the Turkish people. Fair elections also mean ensuring the process isn't rigged in favor of Islamist parties.

We can also approach the Turkish civil war by reevaluating our approach to the region, particularly Syria. The Syrian civil war has had a destabilizing effect on its neighbors, including Turkey, as well as having a dramatic effect on France and our neighbors by contributing to the migration crisis. France has thus far been committed to toppling the Assad regime, but we must reject the fiction that Assad will be replaced by a more rational, democratic, and peaceful alternative. Assad will be replaced by ISIS. Assad will be replaced by terror worse than that which he has inflicted on the Syrian people, and that terror will be exported -- to Turkey, and from Turkey to Eastern Europe, and from Eastern Europe to Western Europe. Our approach to Syria is encouraging terror in Turkey and ultimately terror in France. The madness must end. We must end our intervention in the Syrian civil war and seek a peaceful resolution, and we must do it in cooperation with other partners for peace in Syria, especially Russia. We must restore stability to the region.

5. How will you address issues of global warming?

Domestically, we are already a leader on climate change compared to many developed nations. This is not only due to our serious pursuit of renewable energy, but also our longtime development of nuclear power, which is emissions free. Nuclear power accounts for at least 40% of our energy consumption. I would like to see that increase to 50% over the next decade, which is a realistic goal and one that will further reduce our carbon footprint. Because we have been harnessing nuclear power so long and so effectively, we are also in a unique position to encourage other nations to shift toward greater reliance on nuclear power, and to lead the world in developing nuclear infrastructure. This will be especially important in reducing the massive carbon footprint of the Americans, who have fallen years behind in developing renewable energy but who would be able to develop nuclear power at a much faster pace. France should be prepared to assist the Americans and provide leadership in this area.

6. A 2010 poll found that 2 in 3 French people support the French-speaking region of Belgium (Wallonia) leaving Belgium and joining France. This idea has even become a key component of Mr. Daniau's campaign. Is this a movement that you support? Why or why not?

Frenchmen are Frenchmen, no matter where they are in the world, and that's a principle that must be respected. At the same time, it would be premature to commit to supporting Wallonian union with France. That should ultimately be a decision for the people of Wallonia, in much the same way our membership in the EU must be a decision for Frenchmen. I certainly do support a referendum on the question, and I call upon the Belgian government to oversee such a referendum, with international oversight if needed. That is the necessary first step before we can talk further about resolving the Wallonian question. Should the people of Wallonia wish to join France, there would then be many issues to address with the Belgian government. A French government dedicated solely to French interests, and not to the interests of the EU bureaucracy, is the exact kind of government we would need to ensure responsible but firm negotiations for French interests in resolving those issues, and that's the kind of government I'll provide.

Senator Holly Hawthorne (R-AK)

@HollyHawthorne | Join the Freedom Caucus!

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21 hours ago, Bruce said:

One of the most important issues to voters in this election is the high rate of unemployment in France which consistently is higher than other European countries, particularly among younger citizens. How will you solve this problem?

This has been a problem France has been dealing with for, what, 20 years? Longer? We’ve had mass unemployment for longer than some people can even remember, longer than they were alive. That’s just ridiculous. That’s not something we should see in a modern Western nation. Unfortunately, this isn’t a problem that will go away overnight, it just isn’t. But we can put France on the right track. 

First, I want to cut corporate taxes. Corporations can’t expand and invest in French jobs if the French government is taking all of their money. If we let companies keep more of their money, they can use it to expand and increase their employee count. That means more jobs and more money for the French people. 

Second, we are going to modestly cut wealth taxes, for the same reasons as cutting corporate taxes. This will give the economy a boost and help us recover from the sluggish slump we’ve been stuck in for years. 

Another thing we’ve dealt with is the concern that French jobs are being taken by ungrateful, dangerous immigrants. First off, let me say that not all immigrants are like that. That’s a common misconception. Most of the people France let’s in are just scared refugees who need an escape from their war-torn homes. But we have seen that some are like that. So what we are going to do is make sure that the dangerous, violent refugees are deported faster and held longer if necessary, that way they aren’t taking French jobs and killing French people and hurting our economy. For the good refugees, we will break up places like the Jungle, because they can’t be allowed to stay, and we will build better, safer housing and institute programs to integrate them in to French society, which will provide a long-term boost to our consumer and producer population. 

Finally, I want to say that I will continue to support the building and innovation we are seeing in our nuclear power sector. Nuclear power provides so much energy with so little emissions. It’s very, very clean, so we don’t have to worry about destroying our planet. We’ll invest more in the program, bringing construction, maintenance, engineering, managerial, and more jobs to the French people. 

21 hours ago, Bruce said:

Last year the British people rejected a referendum to leave the European Union. There have been similar calls in France and this has even become a central point of several candidates for President. Do you support it? Why or why not?

Well, if you want to talk about improving the economy, we can’t go and do that. Leaving the EU would be disastrous for our already weak economy, it’s the last thing we need. That would throw even more uncertainty and hardship into our economy, so, no, I don’t really support it. 

Just take a look at what such a thing would mean. It would mean that it’s harder for, say, British businesses to invest in France. That means less jobs, less expansion, less innovation, and more unemployment and debt. It would affect French businesses as well. There would be less capital flowing, and everything would be more difficult for business, and even the French people. Think about how ridiculously hard finding a job can be now...then go and withdraw from the EU? Ten times worse. 

The French people don’t want that. They don’t want to regress decades. They don’t want to undermine our economy even more than it already is, just because some reactionaries are mad on Twitter. If even Britain rejected a referendum for leaving the EU, then I don’t see France approving it. Britain has a history of that kind of movement, but the French people are wiser. 

21 hours ago, Bruce said:

As recently as a year and a half ago we were all reminded how vulnerable France remains to terrorist attacks. As President, how will you protect the French people from future attacks?

Security is another big issue for France. Really, it goes hand in hand with the economy. You can’t have a thriving economy if you aren’t secure. The people of our great country have been threatened time and time again, with France paying the biggest price for the flawed immigration practices that much of Europe has enacted. For too long, this problem has been unsatisfactorily addresses by the people in power. But we have a plan. 

First, we need to provide more resources to our law enforcement. If we want to keep our communities safe, our men and women who serve valiantly in police forces across all of our communes need reinforcements. They need more funding, they need better facilities, better equipment, and they need more comrades. They need brothers-in-arms, sisters-in-arms, more people who will join forces to keep the peace. I want to help with that. We will provide grants and increased funding to communes to improve their law enforcement, specifically in areas that deal with the most violence. 

Next, we need to stabilize the situation in the places all of these people are coming from. Places like Syria. Horrible situation. They’ve got a bad President who gasses his people and can’t even keep order in the place. ISIL is just having a field day there. How do we fix this? How do we stop them from sending terrorists disguised as innocent refugees to our great country? Simple: we take the fight to them. We rebuild our military, creating jobs and opportunity along the way. We talk to our NATO allies: Britain and the United States, and we get a good commitment with them to finally address the issue. More than just airstrikes. We confront Russia, because they’ve been encouraging the chaos that caused this in the first place. We establish a more stable situation there so that they don’t have to come here. We need to make it clear that France is not a weak, complacent nation. We are the nation of Napoleon and Charlemagne, the nation that not only ruled Europe, but created it. We are the inheritors of that proud tradition, and we will fight like it! 

22 hours ago, Bruce said:

How should France approach the civil war in Turkey? 

The civil war in Turkey is a tragic consequence of the bad actions of the Erdogan regime. I agree with the NATO approach of calling for immediate free, fair, supervised elections. I applaud the establishment of the no-fly zone; and I absolutely condemn Russia for fueling the flames. I think we should leave more on the table to establish order and peace, and keep the Russians from controlling a NATO nation. 

((More in a bit!))

Christopher Drake

Republican, NY-2

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives

Former Chief Administrator - Rounds 4 & 5, Evil Arch-Conservative, Frequent Republican Player

 

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23 hours ago, Bruce said:

How will you address issues of global warming?

Well, the French people have already come very far in this regard. Some countries refuse to take leadership on such an important—indeed, existential—issue. The French people know the very real gravity of the situation. It’s a national threat, no doubt about it. We’ve done much as a country to combat it, but we need to go further. There’s more that can be done. 

The previous government negotiated the Paris Climate Accords. These are great guidelines, but they aren’t binding. We need to make sure that we actually try to achieve those goals. That’s why I support the expansion of our solar capabilities. Solar power has only gotten better and more efficient, and with the right infrastructure—batteries, plants, electrical grids—we can really make a big leap towards reducing the harmful carbon emissions we have. That’s why I support improving our nuclear capabilities, upgrading our plants, building new ones, closing old, inefficient ones. The previous government enacted a law that sets a guideline for France to reduce our reliance on nuclear from 75% to 50%. I want to modify that to 60%. That way, we increase our share of solar and other renewables while avoiding handicapping ourselves so that we can’t deal with problems faced by other nations, like Germany. The Germans have begun a huge shift to solar and wind, but they’re having a ton of issues with it. I believe they’re even buying French power! Shows how desperate they are when German engineering can’t get them enough power. *laughs* 

So, how do we pay for these renewable expansions? Well, the government has had a carbon tax, today sitting at about 35 cents. I’m proposing a modest increase to about 40 cents, maybe a bit more. This will keep the impact on the French consumer minimal, but it will increase market incentive towards renewable, cleaner energy. Additionally, the investment we make in solar and nuclear upgrades will create jobs of all kinds: blue-collar, grey-collar, white-collar, educated, construction, managerial, engineering, all kinds. 

I also want to introduce tax credits for companies and individuals who want to move from a carbon-intensive vehicle, especially ones that burn diesel, to more green ones, like hybrids. 

So, my plan? “Greener cars, greener energy, cleaner air, and cleaner leadership.” 

23 hours ago, Bruce said:

A 2010 poll found that 2 in 3 French people support the French-speaking region of Belgium (Wallonia) leaving Belgium and joining France. This idea has even become a key component of Mr. Daniau's campaign. Is this a movement that you support? Why or why not?

Look, I support the cause of self-government for all peoples of the world. If the people of Wallonia want to join France, it should be up to them to do so. I have no objection to Belgium holding a referendum like that. That being said, I don’t support infringing on Belgium’s sovereignty, especially on a poll that is quite outdated. It’d be nice if Belgium would hold a referendum for the Wallonians, but I think France has bigger fish to fry, when we think about our security and anemic employment. It’s not something that really deserves to be the central component of a French, rather than Belgian, political campaign. 

Christopher Drake

Republican, NY-2

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives

Former Chief Administrator - Rounds 4 & 5, Evil Arch-Conservative, Frequent Republican Player

 

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1. Unemployment is a huge problem in this country. We need to create incentives to get the younger generations into the workforce and fill jobs that need skilled workers. We must also build more trade schools and invest more in public universities that have programs to lead to future employment. 

 

2. I don’t like the EU have political power over sovereign nations but the economical downsides of leaving the EU would ruin the French economy instantly. I will push back on the EU trying to run France from Brussels but our economy and people would suffer from leaving. 

 

3. Our security needs major upgrades. We must invest in building a better intelligence infrastructure and developing more counter-terrorist units both in the police forces and military. We must also limit immigration from high risk countries and create a better system of vetting. 

 

4. I believe we as a nation should stay out of the affairs of another country. Our only worry with the situation in turkey is French citizens who may be living there. We must get them out of harms way. 

 

5. Global warming is a serious issue and must be addressed quickly. As a country we should lower our carbon emissions and tax corporations who break environmental protection laws, or who make no effort to become more more planet friendly. 

 

6. Of this region wants to join France then I see no reason why we should not embrace them with open arms. 

 

 

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22 hours ago, Brady said:

Restraining migration and encouraging assimilation are the two vital components. I've proposed a strict net legal migration rate of 10,000 -- we simply must stop taking in migrants faster than they can be assimilated into French culture. I have also proposed completely halting migration from high risk countries in the Middle East and Africa, countries which are frankly the homelands of terror.

I ardently disagree with my opponent here. The French people are a welcoming, kind, Christian people. The refugees coming to our nation have no home, as the civil wars and terrorism have destroyed them all. I agree that we can do a better job assimilating them into our culture, but restricting so many people would leave thousands with no place to go and would stain our nation’s reputation and prestige for generations to come. 

Instead, we should increase resources to our security apparatuses, like police and the military. We should streamline the deportation process, make it faster and easier for our immigration authorities. We should improve housing for refugees. That way, we can keep track of them, keep the peace, stop places like the Calais Jungle from forming, and better assimilate them into our beautiful nation. 

New immigrants offer economic and cultural opportunity. As a moral, pragmatic nation, it would be unwise and abhorrent to turn away scared, helpless masses because of where they were born. God calls on us to love everyone and be charitable. I think we can do that without trading away all of our security. 

Christopher Drake

Republican, NY-2

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives

Former Chief Administrator - Rounds 4 & 5, Evil Arch-Conservative, Frequent Republican Player

 

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22 hours ago, Brady said:

We're seeing a lack of skilled workers even for jobs that are accessible without the need for years more education. On top of that, we're seeing a lack of housing in the areas where these jobs are available. If French workers don't have the skills to do these jobs and can't live where these jobs are located, they can't do these jobs. So this is not just an unemployment problem, it's an education problem and a housing problem. We need to take a page from our Nordic friends and overhaul our education system to emphasize lifelong learning for the skills we'll need tomorrow. We also need to put more resources into affordable housing in the areas jobs are available. There's a little truth-telling from the left.

I agree here. Part of my economic program will be offering economic incentives to young men and women to attend our trade schools and take jobs in manufacturing. There are cities in our nation that have tens of thousands of unfulfilled jobs in plastics, manufacturing, and other things like that. Frankly, that’s ridiculous. We’ve brought down tuition drastically for our big universities, so I think offering more incentives (especially for disadvantaged men and women) for just as necessary trade schools is a good start. 

Additionally, my government would start a campaign to raise the public opinion of these jobs. That’s really a big part of why people won’t take these jobs. They look down on them. But people who do these jobs are valuable; they’re human beings fulfilling an essential, well-paying, worthwhile part of our economy. Other countries don’t have this problem because their people recognize this reality. Let’s bring that truth to France, I say. 

We are going to make it way more viable to attend these trade schools and upgrade your skill set, and get a well-paying job. That’s our plan. 

Christopher Drake

Republican, NY-2

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives

Former Chief Administrator - Rounds 4 & 5, Evil Arch-Conservative, Frequent Republican Player

 

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One of the most important issues to voters in this election is the high rate of unemployment in France which consistently is higher than other European countries, particularly among younger citizens. How will you solve this problem?

The Government must solve this problem by working with the private sector to improve job training, potentially including paying the cost of job training for businesses so they can hire workers and afford to train them rather than simply hoping that the labor market will provide the right mix of skills.  Alongside this, we must require that people be willing to accept such training and work, as long as they are capable of performing both the training and the end-state job, if they are on public assistance.

Additionally, so long as we are part of the European Union, we must also push back against Teutonic austerity within the European Union, fighting to take unemployment levels into account when setting fiscal policy.  If we are going to be bound together as part of the Euro and the EU, then the European Central Bank should be willing to subsidize the debts of states which have chronic employment problems rather than attempting to impose Teutonic fiscal mores.

Finally, I would invest in the expansion of a modern, green infrastructure for our country.  Doing so will create jobs, at least in the short term.

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Last year the British people rejected a referendum to leave the European Union. There have been similar calls in France and this has even become a central point of several candidates for President. Do you support it? Why or why not? 

I support a referendum for two reasons.  First and foremost, we held a referendum on European integration roughly ten years ago.  The voters rejected the deeper integration that was proposed...so of course, the main parties got together and decided to ignore their message and went around the people.  So on that level it is, if nothing else, a matter of democratic legitimacy.

On a deeper level, the European Union has taken to increasingly questionable applications of their mandate...for example, the refugee resettlement mess from the last few years.  I am very concerned that the EU is going to continue to usurp national functions...not as a matter of the public will but as a general matter of course...and use that usurpation to force the nations of Europe to behave as a bunch of Brussels bureaucrats want us to.

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As recently as a year and a half ago we were all reminded how vulnerable France remains to terrorist attacks. As President, how will you protect the French people from future attacks?

In addition to constraining immigration from "troubled areas" such as Syria or Afghanistan, I support the establishment of a stronger security state and improved intelligence operations.  Clearly, there have been weaknesses and failures on this front.  I would specifically emphasize observation and monitoring of individuals known or suspected to have traveled to terrorist hotbeds without obviously innocent reasons.  I would also take greater efforts to monitor online extremism, including but not limited to working to develop national legislation aimed at not only restricting the posting of online content supporting or praising terrorism but also requiring internet service providers to work with the government to help track down the posters of said content.

Seeing as many terrorist threats derive from groups wishing to target Jews, I will also work to improve observation of anti-Semitic groups.

Finally, I will fight to take two clear steps:
First, wherever it is possible to do so, I will work to strip French citizenship of those who become radicalized and join or affiliate with groups such as ISIS.  I feel no shame or compunction about saying that someone who resides in our country but joins such a group is no longer French.

Second, I will fight for legislation to allow us to deport those convicted of joining such groups, regardless of the situation in their home country.  I realize that this will put us in opposition to previous commitments with the United Nations, but in the context of raging radical terrorism I believe that we should consider the effects of those commitments to be an unconscionable burden.  Conceptually, it is one thing to not turn away those in need, but it is entirely another to say that we cannot cut out cancerous cells because the tumor might die as a result.

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How should France approach the civil war in Turkey? 

I believe that, absent a coordinated NATO response, we should keep the crisis at arms' length and quarantine it.  The situation in Turkey is a deeply complicated domestic matter and there is a risk that a half-hearted intervention could simply make things worse.

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How will you address issues of global warming?

I support the reinforcement of our regime of nuclear power plants, to be supplemented by renewable power as best as we are able to.  This should include supporting the development of and construction of next-generation reactors.  Ideally we should phase out the use of fossil fuel power generation over the next decade.  I also support taking steps to establish France as a major exporter of non-fossil-fuel-generated electricity, with an eye towards working to circumvent bans on domestic civil nuclear power.  I will NOT work to phase out nuclear power, period.

We must also work to phase out fossil fuel-based transport wherever practical and where it is not practical we must work to ensure that it can be done more efficiently.  However, we must absolutely ensure that efforts to do this do not unfairly impact consumers: Simply hiking environmental taxes without making it easily affordable for the average citizen to choose a green option is not an acceptable path.  To such an end, as various goals are met for electric vehicle efficiency and accessibility of vehicle charging facilities I would propose that the government should help pay for people to transition first, only raise any fuel taxes after substantial incentives and cost offsets exist for people to make that transition and people have had opportunities to do so, and ensure that people who have a valid reason for not converting...such as living in rural areas where the penetration of charging facilities is low...receive refunds on the higher taxes being levied.

Finally, we must mitigate the effects of global warming and heat waves.  I would propose that the government pay to expand the availability and installation of air conditioning, particularly for the elderly and in areas where heat waves are already having a major impact.  The number of people dying in heat waves is utterly unacceptable.  If we can pay for fancy bullet trains, windmills, and electric cars then we absolutely should be able to pay to ensure that people do not get cooked.

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A 2010 poll found that 2 in 3 French people support the French-speaking region of Belgium (Wallonia) leaving Belgium and joining France. This idea has even become a key component of Mr. Daniau's campaign. Is this a movement that you support? Why or why not?

If the clear will of the citizens of Wallonia were to be support for such a move, then I would support working to negotiate the accession of Wallonia to be part of France.  However, this support must come from Wallonia and as long as the democratic rights of the Walloons are being properly respected it would not be our place to pressure Belgium on this matter.

Andrew Byrd (and family), Virginia

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4 hours ago, SWMissourian said:

The civil war in Turkey is a tragic consequence of the bad actions of the Erdogan regime. I agree with the NATO approach of calling for immediate free, fair, supervised elections. I applaud the establishment of the no-fly zone; and I absolutely condemn Russia for fueling the flames. I think we should leave more on the table to establish order and peace, and keep the Russians from controlling a NATO nation. 

 

I would go a step further: If a pro-Russian government is kept in power in Turkey, I think we must have a serious discussion about dropping them from NATO.  Actions have consequences, and actions such as the current Turkish government buying missiles from Russia or their awful behavior in "passing along" refugees and overwhelming Greece, when taken as part of a broader context, need to have serious consequences.

Andrew Byrd (and family), Virginia

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1 hour ago, SWMissourian said:

I agree here. Part of my economic program will be offering economic incentives to young men and women to attend our trade schools and take jobs in manufacturing. There are cities in our nation that have tens of thousands of unfulfilled jobs in plastics, manufacturing, and other things like that. Frankly, that’s ridiculous. We’ve brought down tuition drastically for our big universities, so I think offering more incentives (especially for disadvantaged men and women) for just as necessary trade schools is a good start. 

Additionally, my government would start a campaign to raise the public opinion of these jobs. That’s really a big part of why people won’t take these jobs. They look down on them. But people who do these jobs are valuable; they’re human beings fulfilling an essential, well-paying, worthwhile part of our economy. Other countries don’t have this problem because their people recognize this reality. Let’s bring that truth to France, I say. 

We are going to make it way more viable to attend these trade schools and upgrade your skill set, and get a well-paying job. That’s our plan. 

I think we must go further than simply saying "support trade schools".  Businesses need incentives to hire and train employees, and simply hiving off a training program for a thousand new employees to a trade school that might not have demand to match in five or ten years, once those positions are filled and they are simply dealing with replacement according to natural attrition, seems like clumsy policy.  This is particularly the case for more specialized companies.

I would subsidize the companies' training programs, potentially working with existing trade schools but also ensuring that the companies are able to design a functional curriculum that serves their needs as opposed to attempting to install cookie-cutter labor certifications and pray they fit enough cases.

Andrew Byrd (and family), Virginia

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2 hours ago, DTMvikings said:

1. Unemployment is a huge problem in this country. We need to create incentives to get the younger generations into the workforce and fill jobs that need skilled workers. We must also build more trade schools and invest more in public universities that have programs to lead to future employment. 

 

2. I don’t like the EU have political power over sovereign nations but the economical downsides of leaving the EU would ruin the French economy instantly. I will push back on the EU trying to run France from Brussels but our economy and people would suffer from leaving. 

 

3. Our security needs major upgrades. We must invest in building a better intelligence infrastructure and developing more counter-terrorist units both in the police forces and military. We must also limit immigration from high risk countries and create a better system of vetting. 

 

4. I believe we as a nation should stay out of the affairs of another country. Our only worry with the situation in turkey is French citizens who may be living there. We must get them out of harms way. 

 

5. Global warming is a serious issue and must be addressed quickly. As a country we should lower our carbon emissions and tax corporations who break environmental protection laws, or who make no effort to become more more planet friendly. 

 

6. Of this region wants to join France then I see no reason why we should not embrace them with open arms. 

 

 

Most of The Republicans' plans reek of simply "throwing money at problems and praying", as well as being the epitome of a long-standing tradition of vague promises from old, tired men.  The youth of Mr. Lafayette notwithstanding, I might as well have been listening to Jaques Chirac or Alain Juppe.  He possesses an old soul in all the wrong ways, and with his nomination it is painfully obvious that at least one main force in French politics is fundamentally spent.

Yes, in a few cases Mr. Lafayette hints at possible solutions, but his statements are only the vaguest hints in that direction.  In no case does he actually get to the point of seriously discussing how to implement his vague ideas, and given that I would have to question how energetically he would even attempt to enact serious solutions rather than just paying them nominal lip service.

Andrew Byrd (and family), Virginia

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2 hours ago, SWMissourian said:

I ardently disagree with my opponent here. The French people are a welcoming, kind, Christian people. The refugees coming to our nation have no home, as the civil wars and terrorism have destroyed them all. I agree that we can do a better job assimilating them into our culture, but restricting so many people would leave thousands with no place to go and would stain our nation’s reputation and prestige for generations to come. 

Instead, we should increase resources to our security apparatuses, like police and the military. We should streamline the deportation process, make it faster and easier for our immigration authorities. We should improve housing for refugees. That way, we can keep track of them, keep the peace, stop places like the Calais Jungle from forming, and better assimilate them into our beautiful nation. 

New immigrants offer economic and cultural opportunity. As a moral, pragmatic nation, it would be unwise and abhorrent to turn away scared, helpless masses because of where they were born. God calls on us to love everyone and be charitable. I think we can do that without trading away all of our security. 

The French people are welcoming and Christian, but too many refugees who we welcome out of the goodness of our hearts have values which are fundamentally in opposition to our values.  Letting too many of them in at a time creates a fundamental risk that, rather than assimilating, they will chose to fight to maintain traditions of theirs which are in opposition to ours.

With that being said, I support stronger steps to assimilate them and support that assimilation...we have a great history that one can become French without being from France...but those steps must be accompanied by making it clear that those who come with various sorts of radical views and associated baggage are not welcome and we will be prepared to return them to from whence they came.

I would also ask who we would feel shamed in front of for taking firm, reasonable steps to deal with these problems.  If other countries are unwilling to prevent cancerous tumors from growing, in the form of radical groups prepared to commit acts of terror, it is they who should feel like fools before the rest of the world.

And I want to be clear that I believe that the broad majority of refugees, of immigrants, might wish to assimilate.  Any decision to pick a number of migrants to limit ourselves to accepting should be fundamentally restricted by our reasonable ability to absorb them.  The more important part of this is to not only vet migrants upon arrival but to keep monitoring them as time goes on.  Choosing to admit someone as a refugee should not be a blanket get-out-of-jail-free card for the refugee to be able to misbehave with no fear of being kicked out.  We've seen consequences of this in Germany, for example, and some of our domestic terror issues might well be related to this lack of will.

Andrew Byrd (and family), Virginia

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