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  2. Senator BARILLA, for himself, submits A BILL To restrict the ability of executive agencies to issue and maintain costly regulations, and for other purposes SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. (a) This bill may be cited as the "Rein in Regulation Act". SEC. 2. GENERAL LIMIT ON COSTLY REGULATIONS. (a) No federal agency, nor any other organ of the US Executive Branch, may issue a regulation or rule whose economic cost has been estimated, either by said agency or by the Office of Management and Budget, as more than $2 billion, unless the regulation or rule is a revision of an existing regulation or rule and is less costly than the existing regulation or rule. (b) All federal agencies, and all other organs of the US Executive Branch, including the Office of Management and Budget, shall be subject to a yearly audit, conducted by a third party, neutral auditor, studying the accuracy of their past cost estimates. The result of such audits shall be made available to the public, and shall be sent to the Speaker of the House, the President Pro Tempore of the Senate, and to the President. (c) EXCEPTION - A federal agency or other organ of the US Executive Branch may issue a regulation or rule that would otherwise be voided under Sec 2(a) by the following process: (i) The President must issue a statement certifying that the regulation is necessary; (ii) Each House of Congress shall give the regulation an up-or-down vote within 20 days of such certification, with no amendment or debate; (iii) The proposed regulation must pass with a majority in both Houses of Congress; (iv) All other applicable laws and procedures regarding the issuance of new or revised regulations or rules have been followed. SEC. 3. LIMITS ON ENERGY-RELATED RULES. (a) For a regulation or rule affecting the production, shipment, or consumption of energy in the United States, the limit in Sec 2(a) shall be $1 billion. SEC. 4. MANDATORY SUNSET PROVISIONS. (a) Any new regulation or rule issued by any federal agency or other organ of the US Executive Branch shall automatically expire five (5) years after its promulgation, unless the agency or organ takes action to re-issue it. (b) Before re-issuing an expiring regulation, a federal agency or other organ of the US Executive Branch shall conduct a cost-benefit analysis to determine if the regulation was necessary, if the regulation was costlier than anticipated, and if the regulation should be re-issued given what is now known SEC. 5. ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE ACT. (a) No section of this act shall be construed so as to remove any other rulemaking or regulatory requirement imposed on federal agencies by the Administrative Procedure Act, or any other legislation SEC. 6. ENACTMENT. (a) This bill shall go into effect immediately upon its Constitutional passage.
  3. Senator BARILLA, for himself, submits A BILL To reduce cyber threats to the United States government, and for other purposes SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. (a) This bill may be cited as the “Cybersecurity Preparedness Act”. SEC. 2. INSIDER THREAT PROGRAM. (a) All agencies of the US federal government shall establish an Insider Threat Program to harden systems and train employees on insider threats to agency cybersecurity, including the threats of: (1) rogue employees accessing or exfiltrating sensitive data; (2) phishing, smishing vishing, or other attempts to gain access to sensitive data; (3) other social engineering attacks. (b) Insider Threat Programs shall include, at least: (1) training of employees in how to identify insider threats, phishing attacks, and social engineering attacks; (2) the use of automated scans to identify suspicious behavior or possible vulnerabilities; (3) institution of policies on emailing agency data outside of the agency. SEC. 3. EXPEDITED CYBERSECURITY PROCUREMENT. (a) Any agency of the US federal government may make a direct, non-competitive award to any qualified cybersecurity vendor for the purpose of improving agency cybersecurity. (b) A “qualified cybersecurity vendor”, for purposes of this act, shall be defined as: (1) any Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC); (2) any private vendor designated as a “qualified cybersecurity vendor” by the Department of Homeland Security. SEC. 4. PROTECTING DIPLOMATS FROM SURVEILLANCE FROM CONSUMER DEVICES. (a) Policy On Location-Tracking Consumer Devices.—Not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall establish a policy on the use of location-tracking consumer devices, including GPS-enabled devices, at United States diplomatic and consular facilities by United States Government employees, contractors, locally employed staff, and members of other agencies deployed to or stationed at such facilities. (b) Security Briefing.—Existing and new employees at United States diplomatic and consular facilities, including contractors, locally employed staff, and members of other agencies deployed to or stationed at such facilities, shall, as a part of the security briefings provided to such employees, be informed of the policy described in subsection (a) and given instructions on the use of location-tracking consumer devices both on and off the premises of such facilities. (c) Coordination.—The Secretary of State shall coordinate with the heads of any other agencies whose employees are deployed to or stationed at United States diplomatic and consular facilities in the formulation of the policy described in subsection (a) and the dissemination of such policy pursuant to subsection (b) (d) Report.—Not later than 30 days after the formulation of the policy described in subsection (a), the Secretary of State shall submit to the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate a report on the details of such policy. SEC. 5. PUBLIC-PRIVATE CYBERSECURITY EXCHANGE PROGRAM. (a) Any agency of the US federal government shall be authorized to participate in a public-private cybersecurity exchange program. (b) A “public-private cybersecurity exchange program” shall be defined as a program where a government cybersecurity employee serves a rotation of up to 18 months working in a private sector entity, or where a private sector cybersecurity employee serves a rotation of up to 18 months working in a US government agency. (c) The Office of Personnel Management shall enact streamlined processes for onboarding of private sector employees serving in government under this section, and shall serve as a clearinghouse for positions and openings under this program. SEC. 6. CYBERSECURITY EXPERT SIGNING BONUS. (a) Any agency of the US federal government shall be authorized to make a one-time “signing bonus” payment to any newly hired cybersecurity expert deemed highly qualified. Signing bonuses shall be capped at no more than 25% of an employee’s starting salary. (b) The sum of $200 million is hereby appropriated to the Office of the Director of National Intelligence for the purpose of funding such signing bonuses in US intelligence agencies. Such funding may be transferred by the office of the DNI to US intelligence agencies for the purpose of providing signing bonuses. SEC. 7. CYBERSECURITY GRANTS. (a) The sum of $500 million per year for each of the next four years is hereby appropriated to the Department of Homeland Security for the purposes of funding grants issued to state and local governments for the purpose of enhancing cybersecuity of state and local government agencies, or critical pieces of infrastructure. (b) The sum of $500 million per year for each of the next four years is hereby appropriated to the Office of Justice Programs within the Department of Justice, for the purpose of funding grants to state and local law enforcement agencies for the purpose of enhancing the cybersecurity of state and local law enforcement. SEC. 8. ENACTMENT. (a) This bill shall go into effect immediately upon Constitutional passage.
  4. Senator BARILLA, for himself, submits A BILL To fight Medicare fraud Section 1. Short Title. (a) This bill may be referred to as the “Fight Medicare Fraud Act”. Sec. 2. Smart Card Technology. (a) Within three years, the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) shall replace all Medicare ID cards with Smart Cards. (b) Smart Cards under this section shall be defined as cards that: (i) are machine readable; (ii) are tamper-resistant; (iii) include an embedded integrated circuit chip that enables the verification and secure authentication of a Medicare beneficiary’s identity (c) CMS shall work with industry to develop card reader technology allowing Medicare suppliers and providers to to authenticate the identity of a Medicare beneficiary using their Smart Card. (d) Within four years, CMS shall require all Medicare suppliers and providers to use such card readers to authenticate the identity of a Medicare beneficiary’s identity. Sec. 3. Beneficiary Education. (a) Each year, CMS shall draft, and shall mail to all Medicare beneficiaries, a report on Medicare Fraud. The report shall contain practical advice for avoiding becoming the victim of Medicare fraud, including, but not limited to: (i) Descriptions of the most common Medicare fraud scheme types; (ii) Advice on how to spot Medicare fraud; (iii) Information on how to report suspected Medicare fraud to relevant authorities; (iv) Information on awards and bounties for Medicare fraud whistleblowers. Sec. 4. Enhanced Penalties. (a) The maximum penalty for knowingly submitting false Medicare claims under the False Claims Act shall be increased to a fine of up to $750,000 and up to ten years in prison. (b) The maximum penalty for knowingly giving or accepting a kickback as part of a Medicare fraud scheme shall be increased to a fine of up to $75,000 and up to ten years in prison. Sec. 5. Enactment. (a) This bill shall go into effect immediately upon Constitutional passage.
  5. Senator BARILLA, for himself, submits A BILL To take action against the opioid abuse epidemic SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. (a) This act may be cited as the “Opioid Action Act”. SEC. 2. BUILDING TREATMENT CENTERS. (a) The sum of $250 million per year for each of the next five years is hereby appropriated to the Department of Health and Human Services, for the purpose of issuing grants to city, township, county, or tribal governments in rural areas, to allow such governments to build opioid treatment centers in rural areas. In distributing funding, the Department of Health and Human Services shall favor governments in areas that do not currently have adequate treatment centers for opioid abuse. SEC. 3. EXPANDING EXISTING GRANT AND RESEARCH PROGRAMS. (a) CARA GRANTS - The Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) is hereby reauthorized, and the sum of $400 million per year for each of the next five years is hereby appropriated to fund it. (a) STATE TARGETED GRANTS - The Opioid State Targeted Response (STR) program within the Department of Health and Human Services is hereby reauthorized, and the sum of $2.83 billion per year for the next five years is hereby appropriated to fund it. (b) RESEARCH FUNDING TO FIGHT ABUSE - An additional $500 million per year for each of the next five years is hereby appropriated to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for the purpose of funding research into improving the prevention and treatment of opioid misuse and addiction. Funds may be used to fund research into areas such as: (1) predictive analysis of abuse or overdoses; (2) improving, optimizing, or providing strategies to prevent opioid abuse or recurrence of opioid abuse; (3) improving, optimizing, or providing strategies for prevention and treatment of opioid misuse or addiction; (4) helping people with an opioid use disorder maintain a meaningful and sustained recovery (c) RESEARCH FUNDING TO FIND ALTERNATIVES - $500 million per year for each of the next five years is hereby appropriated to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for the purpose of funding research into the development or testing of non-habit forming painkillers, which may be suitable for replacing commonly abused opioids. SEC. 4. STRENGTHENING PENALTIES. (a) The maximum federal penalty for unlawful distribution, possession with intent to distribute, manufacture, importation, and exportation of any Schedule III substance shall be increased to a maximum fine of $5 million and a maximum prison sentence of up to 30 years; (b) The maximum federal penalty for unlawful distribution, possession with intent to distribute, manufacture, importation, and exportation of any Schedule II substance shall be increased to a maximum fine of $10 million and a maximum prison sentence of up to 40 years. SEC. 5. INVESTIGATING INDUSTRY. (a) The Department of Justice shall appoint a Special Counsel to launch an investigation of opioid manufacturers and sellers active in the United States, to determine if criminal activity occurred during the marketing or distribution of opioids to communities in the United States. (b) the Special Counsel shall be empowered to issue subpoenas and file charges against any actor involved in the manufacture, marketing, or distribution of opioids, or supporting or tied to any actor involved in the manufacture, marketing, or distribution of opioids. SEC. 6. ENACTMENT. (a) This bill shall take effect immediately upon Constitutional passage.
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  8. Senator BARILLA, for himself, submits A BILL To reform federal land management, and for other purposes SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. (a) This bill may be cited as the Federal Land Reform Act shall adopt the SEC. 2. PUBLIC LANDS. (a) The Department of the Interior shall begin selling land managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) with the goals of: (1) selling, to the extent practical, at least half the qualified land under BLM management; (2) ensuring, to the extent practical, that no more than 50% of the land in any state is owned by the federal government. (b) “Qualified land” shall be defined as any land that is not: (1) a national wilderness area; (2) a national monument; (3) a part of the National Conservation Lands. (c) PREFERRED PURPOSE - the Secretary of the Interior shall prioritize sales in the following categories; (1) sales of land to state governments for the purpose of creating new state parks; (2) sales of land to state governments or private, non-profit organizations for the purpose of creating recreation areas or wildlife preservation areas; (3) sales of land to energy companies, for the purpose of producing energy, including but not limited to wind or solar power; (4) sales of land to technology companies for the purpose of R&D or testing. (d) PROHIBITED BUYERS - the Secretary may not sell any land to any foreign nation, or any agent of a foreign nation. SEC. 3. PUBLIC BUILDINGS. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, any federal agency other than the Department of Defense or any intelligence agency may sell any building it has deemed to no longer be necessary to the performance of its duties or execution of its mission, at public auction to the highest bidder. SEC. 4. ENACTMENT. (a) This bill shall go into effect immediately upon Constitutional passage.
  9. Senator Madison, with thanks Representative Hurd, introduced the following bill: AN ACT To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to establish a security vulnerability disclosure policy, to establish a bug bounty program for the Department of Homeland Security, to amend title 41, United States Code, to provide for Federal acquisition supply chain security, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS. (a) Short Title.—This Act may be cited as the “Strengthening and Enhancing Cyber-capabilities by Utilizing Risk Exposure Technology Act” or the “SECURE Technology Act”. (b) Table Of Contents.—The table of contents for this Act is as follows: Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents. TITLE I—DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INFORMATION SECURITY AND OTHER MATTERS Sec. 101. Department of Homeland Security disclosure of security vulnerabilities. Sec. 102. Department of Homeland Security bug bounty pilot program. Sec. 103. Congressional submittal of reports relating to certain special access programs and similar programs. TITLE II—FEDERAL ACQUISITION SUPPLY CHAIN SECURITY Sec. 201. Short title. Sec. 202. Federal acquisition supply chain security. Sec. 203. Authorities of executive agencies relating to mitigating supply chain risks in the procurement of covered articles. Sec. 204. Federal Information Security Modernization Act. Sec. 205. Effective date. TITLE I—DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INFORMATION SECURITY AND OTHER MATTERS SEC. 101. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISCLOSURE OF SECURITY VULNERABILITIES. (a) Vulnerability Disclosure Policy.—The Secretary of Homeland Security shall establish a policy applicable to individuals, organizations, and companies that report security vulnerabilities on appropriate information systems of Department of Homeland Security. Such policy shall include each of the following: (1) The appropriate information systems of the Department that individuals, organizations, and companies may use to discover and report security vulnerabilities on appropriate information systems. (2) The conditions and criteria under which individuals, organizations, and companies may operate to discover and report security vulnerabilities. (3) How individuals, organizations, and companies may disclose to the Department security vulnerabilities discovered on appropriate information systems of the Department. (4) The ways in which the Department may communicate with individuals, organizations, and companies that report security vulnerabilities. (5) The process the Department shall use for public disclosure of reported security vulnerabilities. (b) Remediation Process.—The Secretary of Homeland Security shall develop a process for the Department of Homeland Security to address the mitigation or remediation of the security vulnerabilities reported through the policy developed in subsection (a). (c) Consultation.— (1) IN GENERAL.—In developing the security vulnerability disclosure policy under subsection (a), the Secretary of Homeland Security shall consult with each of the following: (A) The Attorney General regarding how to ensure that individuals, organizations, and companies that comply with the requirements of the policy developed under subsection (a) are protected from prosecution under section 1030 of title 18, United States Code, civil lawsuits, and similar provisions of law with respect to specific activities authorized under the policy. (B) The Secretary of Defense and the Administrator of General Services regarding lessons that may be applied from existing vulnerability disclosure policies. (C) Non-governmental security researchers. (2) NONAPPLICABILITY OF FACA.—The Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) shall not apply to any consultation under this section. (d) Public Availability.—The Secretary of Homeland Security shall make the policy developed under subsection (a) publicly available. (e) Submission To Congress.— (1) DISCLOSURE POLICY AND REMEDIATION PROCESS.—Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a copy of the policy required under subsection (a) and the remediation process required under subsection (b). (2) REPORT AND BRIEFING.— (A) REPORT.—Not later than one year after establishing the policy required under subsection (a), the Secretary of Homeland Security shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report on such policy and the remediation process required under subsection (b). (B) ANNUAL BRIEFINGS.—One year after the date of the submission of the report under subparagraph (A), and annually thereafter for each of the next three years, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall provide to the appropriate congressional committees a briefing on the policy required under subsection (a) and the process required under subsection (b). (C) MATTERS FOR INCLUSION.—The report required under subparagraph (A) and the briefings required under subparagraph (B) shall include each of the following with respect to the policy required under subsection (a) and the process required under subsection (b) for the period covered by the report or briefing, as the case may be: (i) The number of unique security vulnerabilities reported. (ii) The number of previously unknown security vulnerabilities mitigated or remediated. (iii) The number of unique individuals, organizations, and companies that reported security vulnerabilities. (iv) The average length of time between the reporting of security vulnerabilities and mitigation or remediation of such vulnerabilities. (f) Definitions.—In this section: (1) The term “security vulnerability” has the meaning given that term in section 102(17) of the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act of 2015 (6 U.S.C. 1501(17)), in information technology. (2) The term “information system” has the meaning given that term by section 3502 of title 44, United States Code. (3) The term “appropriate information system” means an information system that the Secretary of Homeland Security selects for inclusion under the vulnerability disclosure policy required by subsection (a). (4) The term “appropriate congressional committees” means— (A) the Committee on Homeland Security, the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives; and (B) the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, and the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate. SEC. 102. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BUG BOUNTY PILOT PROGRAM. (a) Definitions.—In this section: (1) The term “appropriate congressional committees” means— (A) the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate; (B) the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate; (C) the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives; and (D) Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives. (2) The term “bug bounty program” means a program under which— (A) individuals, organizations, and companies are temporarily authorized to identify and report vulnerabilities of appropriate information systems of the Department; and (B) eligible individuals, organizations, and companies receive compensation in exchange for such reports. (3) The term “Department” means the Department of Homeland Security. (4) The term “eligible individual, organization, or company” means an individual, organization, or company that meets such criteria as the Secretary determines in order to receive compensation in compliance with Federal laws. (5) The term “information system” has the meaning given the term in section 3502 of title 44, United States Code. (6) The term “pilot program” means the bug bounty pilot program required to be established under subsection (b)(1). (7) The term “Secretary” means the Secretary of Homeland Security. (b) Bug Bounty Pilot Program.— (1) ESTABLISHMENT.—Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall establish, within the Office of the Chief Information Officer, a bug bounty pilot program to minimize vulnerabilities of appropriate information systems of the Department. (2) RESPONSIBILITIES OF SECRETARY.—In establishing and conducting the pilot program, the Secretary shall— (A) designate appropriate information systems to be included in the pilot program; (B) provide compensation to eligible individuals, organizations, and companies for reports of previously unidentified security vulnerabilities within the information systems designated under subparagraph (A); (C) establish criteria for individuals, organizations, and companies to be considered eligible for compensation under the pilot program in compliance with Federal laws; (D) consult with the Attorney General on how to ensure that approved individuals, organizations, or companies that comply with the requirements of the pilot program are protected from prosecution under section 1030 of title 18, United States Code, and similar provisions of law, and civil lawsuits for specific activities authorized under the pilot program; (E) consult with the Secretary of Defense and the heads of other departments and agencies that have implemented programs to provide compensation for reports of previously undisclosed vulnerabilities in information systems, regarding lessons that may be applied from such programs; and (F) develop an expeditious process by which an individual, organization, or company can register with the Department, submit to a background check as determined by the Department, and receive a determination as to eligibility; and (G) engage qualified interested persons, including non-government sector representatives, about the structure of the pilot program as constructive and to the extent practicable. (3) CONTRACT AUTHORITY.—In establishing the pilot program, the Secretary, subject to the availability of appropriations, may award 1 or more competitive contracts to an entity, as necessary, to manage the pilot program. (c) Report To Congress.—Not later than 180 days after the date on which the pilot program is completed, the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report on the pilot program, which shall include— (1) the number of individuals, organizations, or companies that participated in the pilot program, broken down by the number of individuals, organizations, or companies that— (A) registered; (B) were determined eligible; (C) submitted security vulnerabilities; and (D) received compensation; (2) the number and severity of vulnerabilities reported as part of the pilot program; (3) the number of previously unidentified security vulnerabilities remediated as a result of the pilot program; (4) the current number of outstanding previously unidentified security vulnerabilities and Department remediation plans; (5) the average length of time between the reporting of security vulnerabilities and remediation of the vulnerabilities; (6) the types of compensation provided under the pilot program; and (7) the lessons learned from the pilot program. (d) Authorization Of Appropriations.—There is authorized to be appropriated to the Department $250,000 for fiscal year 2019 to carry out this section. SEC. 103. CONGRESSIONAL SUBMITTAL OF REPORTS RELATING TO CERTAIN SPECIAL ACCESS PROGRAMS AND SIMILAR PROGRAMS. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1994 (50 U.S.C. 3348) is amended— (1) by striking “Congress” each place it appears and inserting “the congressional oversight committees”; (2) in subsection (f)(1), by striking “appropriate oversight committees” and inserting “congressional oversight committees”; and (3) in subsection (g)— (A) by redesignating paragraphs (1) and (2) as paragraphs (2) and (3), respectively; and (B) by inserting before paragraph (2), as so redesignated, the following: “(1) CONGRESSIONAL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEES.—The term ‘congressional oversight committees’ means— “(A) congressional leadership and authorizing and appropriations congressional committees with jurisdiction or shared jurisdiction over a department or agency; “(B) the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate; and “(C) the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform of the House of Representatives.”. TITLE II—FEDERAL ACQUISITION SUPPLY CHAIN SECURITY SEC. 201. SHORT TITLE. This title may be cited as the “Federal Acquisition Supply Chain Security Act of 2018”. SEC. 202. FEDERAL ACQUISITION SUPPLY CHAIN SECURITY. (a) In General.—Chapter 13 of title 41, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following new subchapter: “SUBCHAPTER III—FEDERAL ACQUISITION SUPPLY CHAIN SECURITY “§ 1321. Definitions “In this subchapter: “(1) APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES AND LEADERSHIP.—The term ‘appropriate congressional committees and leadership’ means— “(A) the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, the Committee on the Judiciary, the Committee on Appropriations, the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, the Select Committee on Intelligence, and the majority and minority leader of the Senate; and “(B) the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, the Committee on the Judiciary, the Committee on Appropriations, the Committee on Homeland Security, the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Energy and Commerce, the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, and the Speaker and minority leader of the House of Representatives. “(2) COUNCIL.—The term ‘Council’ means the Federal Acquisition Security Council established under section 1322(a) of this title. “(3) COVERED ARTICLE.—The term ‘covered article’ has the meaning given that term in section 4713 of this title. “(4) COVERED PROCUREMENT ACTION.—The term ‘covered procurement action’ has the meaning given that term in section 4713 of this title. “(5) INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY.—The term ‘information and communications technology’ has the meaning given that term in section 4713 of this title. “(6) INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY.—The term ‘intelligence community’ has the meaning given that term in section 3(4) of the National Security Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 3003(4)). “(7) NATIONAL SECURITY SYSTEM.—The term ‘national security system’ has the meaning given that term in section 3552 of title 44. “(8) SUPPLY CHAIN RISK.—The term ‘supply chain risk’ has the meaning given that term in section 4713 of this title. “§ 1322. Federal Acquisition Security Council establishment and membership “(a) Establishment.—There is established in the executive branch a Federal Acquisition Security Council. “(b) Membership.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—The following agencies shall be represented on the Council: “(A) The Office of Management and Budget. “(B) The General Services Administration. “(C) The Department of Homeland Security, including the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. “(D) The Office of the Director of National Intelligence, including the National Counterintelligence and Security Center. “(E) The Department of Justice, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation. “(F) The Department of Defense, including the National Security Agency. “(G) The Department of Commerce, including the National Institute of Standards and Technology. “(H) Such other executive agencies as determined by the Chairperson of the Council. “(2) LEAD REPRESENTATIVES.— “(A) DESIGNATION.— “(i) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 45 days after the date of the enactment of the Federal Acquisition Supply Chain Security Act of 2018, the head of each agency represented on the Council shall designate a representative of that agency as the lead representative of the agency on the Council. “(ii) REQUIREMENTS.—The representative of an agency designated under clause (i) shall have expertise in supply chain risk management, acquisitions, or information and communications technology. “(B) FUNCTIONS.—The lead representative of an agency designated under subparagraph (A) shall ensure that appropriate personnel, including leadership and subject matter experts of the agency, are aware of the business of the Council. “(c) Chairperson.— “(1) DESIGNATION.—Not later than 45 days after the date of the enactment of the Federal Acquisition Supply Chain Security Act of 2018, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget shall designate a senior-level official from the Office of Management and Budget to serve as the Chairperson of the Council. “(2) FUNCTIONS.—The Chairperson shall perform functions that include— “(A) subject to subsection (d), developing a schedule for meetings of the Council; “(B) designating executive agencies to be represented on the Council under subsection (b)(1)(H); “(C) in consultation with the lead representative of each agency represented on the Council, developing a charter for the Council; and “(D) not later than 7 days after completion of the charter, submitting the charter to the appropriate congressional committees and leadership. “(d) Meetings.—The Council shall meet not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of the Federal Acquisition Supply Chain Security Act of 2018 and not less frequently than quarterly thereafter. “§ 1323. Functions and authorities “(a) In General.—The Council shall perform functions that include the following: “(1) Identifying and recommending development by the National Institute of Standards and Technology of supply chain risk management standards, guidelines, and practices for executive agencies to use when assessing and developing mitigation strategies to address supply chain risks, particularly in the acquisition and use of covered articles under section 1326(a) of this title. “(2) Identifying or developing criteria for sharing information with executive agencies, other Federal entities, and non-Federal entities with respect to supply chain risk, including information related to the exercise of authorities provided under this section and sections 1326 and 4713 of this title. At a minimum, such criteria shall address— “(A) the content to be shared; “(B) the circumstances under which sharing is mandated or voluntary; and “(C) the circumstances under which it is appropriate for an executive agency to rely on information made available through such sharing in exercising the responsibilities and authorities provided under this section and section 4713 of this title. “(3) Identifying an appropriate executive agency to— “(A) accept information submitted by executive agencies based on the criteria established under paragraph (2); “(B) facilitate the sharing of information received under subparagraph (A) to support supply chain risk analyses under section 1326 of this title, recommendations under this section, and covered procurement actions under section 4713 of this title; “(C) share with the Council information regarding covered procurement actions by executive agencies taken under section 4713 of this title; and “(D) inform the Council of orders issued under this section. “(4) Identifying, as appropriate, executive agencies to provide— “(A) shared services, such as support for making risk assessments, validation of products that may be suitable for acquisition, and mitigation activities; and “(B) common contract solutions to support supply chain risk management activities, such as subscription services or machine-learning-enhanced analysis applications to support informed decision making. “(5) Identifying and issuing guidance on additional steps that may be necessary to address supply chain risks arising in the course of executive agencies providing shared services, common contract solutions, acquisitions vehicles, or assisted acquisitions. “(6) Engaging with the private sector and other nongovernmental stakeholders in performing the functions described in paragraphs (1) and (2) and on issues relating to the management of supply chain risks posed by the acquisition of covered articles. “(7) Carrying out such other actions, as determined by the Council, that are necessary to reduce the supply chain risks posed by acquisitions and use of covered articles. “(b) Program Office And Committees.—The Council may establish a program office and any committees, working groups, or other constituent bodies the Council deems appropriate, in its sole and unreviewable discretion, to carry out its functions. “(c) Authority For Exclusion Or Removal Orders.— “(1) CRITERIA.—To reduce supply chain risk, the Council shall establish criteria and procedures for— “(A) recommending orders applicable to executive agencies requiring the exclusion of sources or covered articles from executive agency procurement actions (in this section referred to as ‘exclusion orders’); “(B) recommending orders applicable to executive agencies requiring the removal of covered articles from executive agency information systems (in this section referred to as ‘removal orders’); “(C) requesting and approving exceptions to an issued exclusion or removal order when warranted by circumstances, including alternative mitigation actions or other findings relating to the national interest, including national security reviews, national security investigations, or national security agreements; and “(D) ensuring that recommended orders do not conflict with standards and guidelines issued under section 11331 of title 40 and that the Council consults with the Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology regarding any recommended orders that would implement standards and guidelines developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. “(2) RECOMMENDATIONS.—The Council shall use the criteria established under paragraph (1), information made available under subsection (a)(3), and any other information the Council determines appropriate to issue recommendations, for application to executive agencies or any subset thereof, regarding the exclusion of sources or covered articles from any executive agency procurement action, including source selection and consent for a contractor to subcontract, or the removal of covered articles from executive agency information systems. Such recommendations shall include— “(A) information necessary to positively identify the sources or covered articles recommended for exclusion or removal; “(B) information regarding the scope and applicability of the recommended exclusion or removal order; “(C) a summary of any risk assessment reviewed or conducted in support of the recommended exclusion or removal order; “(D) a summary of the basis for the recommendation, including a discussion of less intrusive measures that were considered and why such measures were not reasonably available to reduce supply chain risk; “(E) a description of the actions necessary to implement the recommended exclusion or removal order; and “(F) where practicable, in the Council’s sole and unreviewable discretion, a description of mitigation steps that could be taken by the source that may result in the Council rescinding a recommendation. “(3) NOTICE OF RECOMMENDATION AND REVIEW.—A notice of the Council’s recommendation under paragraph (2) shall be issued to any source named in the recommendation advising— “(A) that a recommendation has been made; “(B) of the criteria the Council relied upon under paragraph (1) and, to the extent consistent with national security and law enforcement interests, of information that forms the basis for the recommendation; “(C) that, within 30 days after receipt of notice, the source may submit information and argument in opposition to the recommendation; “(D) of the procedures governing the review and possible issuance of an exclusion or removal order pursuant to paragraph (5); and “(E) where practicable, in the Council’s sole and unreviewable discretion, a description of mitigation steps that could be taken by the source that may result in the Council rescinding the recommendation. “(4) CONFIDENTIALITY.—Any notice issued to a source under paragraph (3) shall be kept confidential until— “(A) an exclusion or removal order is issued pursuant to paragraph (5); and “(B) the source has been notified pursuant to paragraph (6). “(5) EXCLUSION AND REMOVAL ORDERS.— “(A) ORDER ISSUANCE.—Recommendations of the Council under paragraph (2), together with any information submitted by a source under paragraph (3) related to such a recommendation, shall be reviewed by the following officials, who may issue exclusion and removal orders based upon such recommendations: “(i) The Secretary of Homeland Security, for exclusion and removal orders applicable to civilian agencies, to the extent not covered by clause (ii) or (iii). “(ii) The Secretary of Defense, for exclusion and removal orders applicable to the Department of Defense and national security systems other than sensitive compartmented information systems. “(iii) The Director of National Intelligence, for exclusion and removal orders applicable to the intelligence community and sensitive compartmented information systems, to the extent not covered by clause (ii). “(B) DELEGATION.—The officials identified in subparagraph (A) may not delegate any authority under this subparagraph to an official below the level one level below the Deputy Secretary or Principal Deputy Director, except that the Secretary of Defense may delegate authority for removal orders to the Commander of the United States Cyber Command, who may not redelegate such authority to an official below the level one level below the Deputy Commander. “(C) FACILITATION OF EXCLUSION ORDERS.—If officials identified under this paragraph from the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Defense, and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence issue orders collectively resulting in a governmentwide exclusion, the Administrator for General Services and officials at other executive agencies responsible for management of the Federal Supply Schedules, governmentwide acquisition contracts and multi-agency contracts shall help facilitate implementation of such orders by removing the covered articles or sources identified in the orders from such contracts. “(D) REVIEW OF EXCLUSION AND REMOVAL ORDERS.—The officials identified under this paragraph shall review all exclusion and removal orders issued under subparagraph (A) not less frequently than annually pursuant to procedures established by the Council. “(E) RESCISSION.—Orders issued pursuant to subparagraph (A) may be rescinded by an authorized official from the relevant issuing agency. “(6) NOTIFICATIONS.—Upon issuance of an exclusion or removal order pursuant to paragraph (5)(A), the official identified under that paragraph who issued the order shall— “(A) notify any source named in the order of— “(i) the exclusion or removal order; and “(ii) to the extent consistent with national security and law enforcement interests, information that forms the basis for the order; “(B) provide classified or unclassified notice of the exclusion or removal order to the appropriate congressional committees and leadership; and “(C) provide the exclusion or removal order to the agency identified in subsection (a)(3). “(7) COMPLIANCE.—Executive agencies shall comply with exclusion and removal orders issued pursuant to paragraph (5). “(d) Authority To Request Information.—The Council may request such information from executive agencies as is necessary for the Council to carry out its functions. “(e) Relationship To Other Councils.—The Council shall consult and coordinate, as appropriate, with other relevant councils and interagency committees, including the Chief Information Officers Council, the Chief Acquisition Officers Council, the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council, and the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, with respect to supply chain risks posed by the acquisition and use of covered articles. “(f) Rules Of Construction.—Nothing in this section shall be construed— “(1) to limit the authority of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy to carry out the responsibilities of that Office under any other provision of law; or “(2) to authorize the issuance of an exclusion or removal order based solely on the fact of foreign ownership of a potential procurement source that is otherwise qualified to enter into procurement contracts with the Federal Government. “§ 1324. Strategic plan “(a) In General.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of the Federal Acquisition Supply Chain Security Act of 2018, the Council shall develop a strategic plan for addressing supply chain risks posed by the acquisition of covered articles and for managing such risks that includes— “(1) the criteria and processes required under section 1323(a) of this title, including a threshold and requirements for sharing relevant information about such risks with all executive agencies and, as appropriate, with other Federal entities and non-Federal entities; “(2) an identification of existing authorities for addressing such risks; “(3) an identification and promulgation of best practices and procedures and available resources for executive agencies to assess and mitigate such risks; “(4) recommendations for any legislative, regulatory, or other policy changes to improve efforts to address such risks; “(5) recommendations for any legislative, regulatory, or other policy changes to incentivize the adoption of best practices for supply chain risk management by the private sector; “(6) an evaluation of the effect of implementing new policies or procedures on existing contracts and the procurement process; “(7) a plan for engaging with executive agencies, the private sector, and other nongovernmental stakeholders to address such risks; “(8) a plan for identification, assessment, mitigation, and vetting of supply chain risks from existing and prospective information and communications technology made available by executive agencies to other executive agencies through common contract solutions, shared services, acquisition vehicles, or other assisted acquisition services; and “(9) plans to strengthen the capacity of all executive agencies to conduct assessments of— “(A) the supply chain risk posed by the acquisition of covered articles; and “(B) compliance with the requirements of this subchapter. “(b) Submission To Congress.—Not later than 7 calendar days after completion of the strategic plan required by subsection (a), the Chairperson of the Council shall submit the plan to the appropriate congressional committees and leadership. “§ 1325. Annual report “Not later than December 31 of each year, the Chairperson of the Council shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees and leadership a report on the activities of the Council during the preceding 12-month period. “§ 1326. Requirements for executive agencies “(a) In General.—The head of each executive agency shall be responsible for— “(1) assessing the supply chain risk posed by the acquisition and use of covered articles and avoiding, mitigating, accepting, or transferring that risk, as appropriate and consistent with the standards, guidelines, and practices identified by the Council under section 1323(a)(1); and “(2) prioritizing supply chain risk assessments conducted under paragraph (1) based on the criticality of the mission, system, component, service, or asset. “(b) Inclusions.—The responsibility for assessing supply chain risk described in subsection (a) includes— “(1) developing an overall supply chain risk management strategy and implementation plan and policies and processes to guide and govern supply chain risk management activities; “(2) integrating supply chain risk management practices throughout the life cycle of the system, component, service, or asset; “(3) limiting, avoiding, mitigating, accepting, or transferring any identified risk; “(4) sharing relevant information with other executive agencies as determined appropriate by the Council in a manner consistent with section 1323(a) of this title; “(5) reporting on progress and effectiveness of the agency’s supply chain risk management consistent with guidance issued by the Office of Management and Budget and the Council; and “(6) ensuring that all relevant information, including classified information, with respect to acquisitions of covered articles that may pose a supply chain risk, consistent with section 1323(a) of this title, is incorporated into existing processes of the agency for conducting assessments described in subsection (a) and ongoing management of acquisition programs, including any identification, investigation, mitigation, or remediation needs. “(c) Interagency Acquisitions.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—Except as provided in paragraph (2), in the case of an interagency acquisition, subsection (a) shall be carried out by the head of the executive agency whose funds are being used to procure the covered article. “(2) ASSISTED ACQUISITIONS.—In an assisted acquisition, the parties to the acquisition shall determine, as part of the interagency agreement governing the acquisition, which agency is responsible for carrying out subsection (a). “(3) DEFINITIONS.—In this subsection, the terms ‘assisted acquisition’ and ‘interagency acquisition’ have the meanings given those terms in section 2.101 of title 48, Code of Federal Regulations (or any corresponding similar regulation or ruling). “(d) Assistance.—The Secretary of Homeland Security may— “(1) assist executive agencies in conducting risk assessments described in subsection (a) and implementing mitigation requirements for information and communications technology; and “(2) provide such additional guidance or tools as are necessary to support actions taken by executive agencies. “§ 1327. Judicial review procedures “(a) In General.—Except as provided in subsection (b) and chapter 71 of this title, and notwithstanding any other provision of law, an action taken under section 1323 or 4713 of this title, or any action taken by an executive agency to implement such an action, shall not be subject to administrative review or judicial review, including bid protests before the Government Accountability Office or in any Federal court. “(b) Petitions.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 60 days after a party is notified of an exclusion or removal order under section 1323(c)(6) of this title or a covered procurement action under section 4713 of this title, the party may file a petition for judicial review in the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit claiming that the issuance of the exclusion or removal order or covered procurement action is unlawful. “(2) STANDARD OF REVIEW.—The Court shall hold unlawful a covered action taken under sections 1323 or 4713 of this title, in response to a petition that the court finds to be— “(A) arbitrary, capricious, an abuse of discretion, or otherwise not in accordance with law; “(B) contrary to constitutional right, power, privilege, or immunity; “(C) in excess of statutory jurisdiction, authority, or limitation, or short of statutory right; “(D) lacking substantial support in the administrative record taken as a whole or in classified information submitted to the court under paragraph (3); or “(E) not in accord with procedures required by law. “(3) EXCLUSIVE JURISDICTION.—The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit shall have exclusive jurisdiction over claims arising under sections 1323(c)(5) or 4713 of this title against the United States, any United States department or agency, or any component or official of any such department or agency, subject to review by the Supreme Court of the United States under section 1254 of title 28. “(4) ADMINISTRATIVE RECORD AND PROCEDURES.— “(A) IN GENERAL.—The procedures described in this paragraph shall apply to the review of a petition under this section. “(B) ADMINISTRATIVE RECORD.— “(i) FILING OF RECORD.—The United States shall file with the court an administrative record, which shall consist of the information that the appropriate official relied upon in issuing an exclusion or removal order under section 1323(c)(5) or a covered procurement action under section 4713 of this title. “(ii) UNCLASSIFIED, NONPRIVILEGED INFORMATION.—All unclassified information contained in the administrative record that is not otherwise privileged or subject to statutory protections shall be provided to the petitioner with appropriate protections for any privileged or confidential trade secrets and commercial or financial information. “(iii) IN CAMERA AND EX PARTE.—The following information may be included in the administrative record and shall be submitted only to the court ex parte and in camera: “(I) Classified information. “(II) Sensitive security information, as defined by section 1520.5 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations. “(III) Privileged law enforcement information. “(IV) Information obtained or derived from any activity authorized under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 (50 U.S.C. 1801 et seq.), except that, with respect to such information, subsections (c), (e), (f), (g), and (h) of section 106 (50 U.S.C. 1806), subsections (d), (f), (g), (h), and (i) of section 305 (50 U.S.C. 1825), subsections (c), (e), (f), (g), and (h) of section 405 (50 U.S.C. 1845), and section 706 (50 U.S.C. 1881e) of that Act shall not apply. “(V) Information subject to privilege or protections under any other provision of law. “(iv) UNDER SEAL.—Any information that is part of the administrative record filed ex parte and in camera under clause (iii), or cited by the court in any decision, shall be treated by the court consistent with the provisions of this subparagraph and shall remain under seal and preserved in the records of the court to be made available consistent with the above provisions in the event of further proceedings. In no event shall such information be released to the petitioner or as part of the public record. “(v) RETURN.—After the expiration of the time to seek further review, or the conclusion of further proceedings, the court shall return the administrative record, including any and all copies, to the United States. “(C) EXCLUSIVE REMEDY.—A determination by the court under this subsection shall be the exclusive judicial remedy for any claim described in this section against the United States, any United States department or agency, or any component or official of any such department or agency. “(D) RULE OF CONSTRUCTION.—Nothing in this section shall be construed as limiting, superseding, or preventing the invocation of, any privileges or defenses that are otherwise available at law or in equity to protect against the disclosure of information. “(c) Definition.—In this section, the term ‘classified information’— “(1) has the meaning given that term in section 1(a) of the Classified Information Procedures Act (18 U.S.C. App.); and “(2) includes— “(A) any information or material that has been determined by the United States Government pursuant to an Executive order, statute, or regulation to require protection against unauthorized disclosure for reasons of national security; and “(B) any restricted data, as defined in section 11 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C. 2014). “§ 1328. Termination “This subchapter shall terminate on the date that is 5 years after the date of the enactment of the Federal Acquisition Supply Chain Security Act of 2018”..”. (b) Clerical Amendment.—The table of sections at the beginning of chapter 13 of such title is amended by adding at the end the following new items: “SUBCHAPTER III—FEDERAL ACQUISITION SUPPLY CHAIN SECURITY “Sec. “1321. Definitions. “1322. Federal Acquisition Security Council establishment and membership. “1323. Functions and authorities. “1324. Strategic plan. “1325. Annual report. “1326. Requirements for executive agencies. “1327. Judicial review procedures. “1328. Termination.”. (c) Effective Date.—The amendments made by this section shall take effect on the date that is 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act and shall apply to contracts that are awarded before, on, or after that date. (d) Implementation.— (1) INTERIM FINAL RULE.—Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Federal Acquisition Security Council shall prescribe an interim final rule to implement subchapter III of chapter 13 of title 41, United States Code, as added by subsection (a). (2) FINAL RULE.—Not later than one year after prescribing the interim final rule under paragraph (1) and considering public comments with respect to such interim final rule, the Council shall prescribe a final rule to implement subchapter III of chapter 13 of title 41, United States Code, as added by subsection (a). (3) FAILURE TO ACT.— (A) IN GENERAL.—If the Council does not issue a final rule in accordance with paragraph (2) on or before the last day of the one-year period referred to in that paragraph, the Council shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees and leadership, not later than 10 days after such last day and every 90 days thereafter until the final rule is issued, a report explaining why the final rule was not timely issued and providing an estimate of the earliest date on which the final rule will be issued. (B) APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES AND LEADERSHIP DEFINED.—In this paragraph, the term “appropriate congressional committees and leadership” has the meaning given that term in section 1321 of title 41, United States Code, as added by subsection (a). SEC. 203. AUTHORITIES OF EXECUTIVE AGENCIES RELATING TO MITIGATING SUPPLY CHAIN RISKS IN THE PROCUREMENT OF COVERED ARTICLES. (a) In General.—Chapter 47 of title 41, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following new section: “§ 4713. Authorities relating to mitigating supply chain risks in the procurement of covered articles “(a) Authority.—Subject to subsection (b), the head of an executive agency may carry out a covered procurement action. “(b) Determination And Notification.—Except as authorized by subsection (c) to address an urgent national security interest, the head of an executive agency may exercise the authority provided in subsection (a) only after— “(1) obtaining a joint recommendation, in unclassified or classified form, from the chief acquisition officer and the chief information officer of the agency, or officials performing similar functions in the case of executive agencies that do not have such officials, which includes a review of any risk assessment made available by the executive agency identified under section 1323(a)(3) of this title, that there is a significant supply chain risk in a covered procurement; “(2) providing notice of the joint recommendation described in paragraph (1) to any source named in the joint recommendation advising— “(A) that a recommendation is being considered or has been obtained; “(B) to the extent consistent with the national security and law enforcement interests, of information that forms the basis for the recommendation; “(C) that, within 30 days after receipt of the notice, the source may submit information and argument in opposition to the recommendation; and “(D) of the procedures governing the consideration of the submission and the possible exercise of the authority provided in subsection (a); “(3) making a determination in writing, in unclassified or classified form, after considering any information submitted by a source under paragraph (2) and in consultation with the chief information security officer of the agency, that— “(A) use of the authority under subsection (a) is necessary to protect national security by reducing supply chain risk; “(B) less intrusive measures are not reasonably available to reduce such supply chain risk; and “(C) the use of such authorities will apply to a single covered procurement or a class of covered procurements, and otherwise specifies the scope of the determination; and “(4) providing a classified or unclassified notice of the determination made under paragraph (3) to the appropriate congressional committees and leadership that includes— “(A) the joint recommendation described in paragraph (1); “(B) a summary of any risk assessment reviewed in support of the joint recommendation required by paragraph (1); and “(C) a summary of the basis for the determination, including a discussion of less intrusive measures that were considered and why such measures were not reasonably available to reduce supply chain risk. “(c) Procedures To Address Urgent National Security Interests.—In any case in which the head of an executive agency determines that an urgent national security interest requires the immediate exercise of the authority provided in subsection (a), the head of the agency— “(1) may, to the extent necessary to address such national security interest, and subject to the conditions in paragraph (2)— “(A) temporarily delay the notice required by subsection (b)(2); “(B) make the determination required by subsection (b)(3), regardless of whether the notice required by subsection (b)(2) has been provided or whether the notified source has submitted any information in response to such notice; “(C) temporarily delay the notice required by subsection (b)(4); and “(D) exercise the authority provided in subsection (a) in accordance with such determination within 60 calendar days after the day the determination is made; and “(2) shall take actions necessary to comply with all requirements of subsection (b) as soon as practicable after addressing the urgent national security interest, including— “(A) providing the notice required by subsection (b)(2); “(B) promptly considering any information submitted by the source in response to such notice, and making any appropriate modifications to the determination based on such information; “(C) providing the notice required by subsection (b)(4), including a description of the urgent national security interest, and any modifications to the determination made in accordance with subparagraph (B); and “(D) providing notice to the appropriate congressional committees and leadership within 7 calendar days of the covered procurement actions taken under this section. “(d) Confidentiality.—The notice required by subsection (b)(2) shall be kept confidential until a determination with respect to a covered procurement action has been made pursuant to subsection (b)(3). “(e) Delegation.—The head of an executive agency may not delegate the authority provided in subsection (a) or the responsibility identified in subsection (f) to an official below the level one level below the Deputy Secretary or Principal Deputy Director. “(f) Annual Review Of Determinations.—The head of an executive agency shall conduct an annual review of all determinations made by such head under subsection (b) and promptly amend any covered procurement action as appropriate. “(g) Regulations.—The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council shall prescribe such regulations as may be necessary to carry out this section. “(h) Reports Required.—Not less frequently than annually, the head of each executive agency that exercised the authority provided in subsection (a) or (c) during the preceding 12-month period shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees and leadership a report summarizing the actions taken by the agency under this section during that 12-month period. “(i) Rule Of Construction.—Nothing in this section shall be construed to authorize the head of an executive agency to carry out a covered procurement action based solely on the fact of foreign ownership of a potential procurement source that is otherwise qualified to enter into procurement contracts with the Federal Government. “(j) Termination.—The authority provided under subsection (a) shall terminate on the date that is 5 years after the date of the enactment of the Federal Acquisition Supply Chain Security Act of 2018. “(k) Definitions.—In this section: “(1) APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES AND LEADERSHIP.—The term ‘appropriate congressional committees and leadership’ means— “(A) the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, the Committee on the Judiciary, the Committee on Appropriations, the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, the Select Committee on Intelligence, and the majority and minority leader of the Senate; and “(B) the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, the Committee on the Judiciary, the Committee on Appropriations, the Committee on Homeland Security, the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Energy and Commerce, the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, and the Speaker and minority leader of the House of Representatives. “(2) COVERED ARTICLE.—The term ‘covered article’ means— “(A) information technology, as defined in section 11101 of title 40, including cloud computing services of all types; “(B) telecommunications equipment or telecommunications service, as those terms are defined in section 3 of the Communications Act of 1934 (47 U.S.C. 153); “(C) the processing of information on a Federal or non-Federal information system, subject to the requirements of the Controlled Unclassified Information program; or “(D) hardware, systems, devices, software, or services that include embedded or incidental information technology. “(3) COVERED PROCUREMENT.—The term ‘covered procurement’ means— “(A) a source selection for a covered article involving either a performance specification, as provided in subsection (a)(3)(B) of section 3306 of this title, or an evaluation factor, as provided in subsection (b)(1)(A) of such section, relating to a supply chain risk, or where supply chain risk considerations are included in the agency’s determination of whether a source is a responsible source as defined in section 113 of this title; “(B) the consideration of proposals for and issuance of a task or delivery order for a covered article, as provided in section 4106(d)(3) of this title, where the task or delivery order contract includes a contract clause establishing a requirement relating to a supply chain risk; “(C) any contract action involving a contract for a covered article where the contract includes a clause establishing requirements relating to a supply chain risk; or “(D) any other procurement in a category of procurements determined appropriate by the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council, with the advice of the Federal Acquisition Security Council. “(4) COVERED PROCUREMENT ACTION.—The term ‘covered procurement action’ means any of the following actions, if the action takes place in the course of conducting a covered procurement: “(A) The exclusion of a source that fails to meet qualification requirements established under section 3311 of this title for the purpose of reducing supply chain risk in the acquisition or use of covered articles. “(B) The exclusion of a source that fails to achieve an acceptable rating with regard to an evaluation factor providing for the consideration of supply chain risk in the evaluation of proposals for the award of a contract or the issuance of a task or delivery order. “(C) The determination that a source is not a responsible source as defined in section 113 of this title based on considerations of supply chain risk. “(D) The decision to withhold consent for a contractor to subcontract with a particular source or to direct a contractor to exclude a particular source from consideration for a subcontract under the contract. “(5) INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY.—The term ‘information and communications technology’ means— “(A) information technology, as defined in section 11101 of title 40; “(B) information systems, as defined in section 3502 of title 44; and “(C) telecommunications equipment and telecommunications services, as those terms are defined in section 3 of the Communications Act of 1934 (47 U.S.C. 153). “(6) SUPPLY CHAIN RISK.—The term ‘supply chain risk’ means the risk that any person may sabotage, maliciously introduce unwanted function, extract data, or otherwise manipulate the design, integrity, manufacturing, production, distribution, installation, operation, maintenance, disposition, or retirement of covered articles so as to surveil, deny, disrupt, or otherwise manipulate the function, use, or operation of the covered articles or information stored or transmitted on the covered articles. “(7) EXECUTIVE AGENCY.—Notwithstanding section 3101(c)(1), this section applies to the Department of Defense, the Coast Guard, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.”. (b) Clerical Amendment.—The table of sections at the beginning of chapter 47 of such title is amended by adding at the end the following new item: “4713. Authorities relating to mitigating supply chain risks in the procurement of covered articles.”. (c) Effective Date.—The amendments made by this section shall take effect on the date that is 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act and shall apply to contracts that are awarded before, on, or after that date. SEC. 204. FEDERAL INFORMATION SECURITY MODERNIZATION ACT. (a) In General.—Title 44, United States Code, is amended— (1) in section 3553(a)(5), by inserting “and section 1326 of title 41” after “compliance with the requirements of this subchapter”; and (2) in section 3554(a)(1)(B)— (A) by inserting “, subchapter III of chapter 13 of title 41,” after “complying with the requirements of this subchapter”; (B) in clause (iv), by striking “; and” and inserting a semicolon; and (C) by adding at the end the following new clause: “(vi) responsibilities relating to assessing and avoiding, mitigating, transferring, or accepting supply chain risks under section 1326 of title 41, and complying with exclusion and removal orders issued under section 1323 of such title; and”. (b) Rule Of Construction.—Nothing in this title shall be construed to alter or impede any authority or responsibility under section 3553 of title 44, United States Code. SEC. 205. EFFECTIVE DATE. This title shall take effect on the date that is 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act. PES: TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INFORMATION SECURITY AND OTHER MATTERS (Sec. 101) This bill directs the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to: (1) establish a policy applicable to individuals, organizations, and companies to report security vulnerabilities on DHS information systems; and (2) develop a process to address the mitigation or remediation of the vulnerabilities reported. DHS shall make such policy publicly available and submit a copy to Congress with the required remediation process. (Sec. 102) DHS shall establish, within the Office of the Chief Information Officer, a bug bounty pilot program to minimize security vulnerabilities. "Bug bounty program" means a program under which: (1) individuals, organizations, and companies are temporarily authorized to identify and report vulnerabilities of DHS information systems; and (2) eligible individuals, organizations, and companies receive compensation in exchange for such reports. TITLE II--FEDERAL ACQUISITION SUPPLY CHAIN SECURITY Federal Acquisition Supply Chain Security Act of 2018 (Sec. 202) This bill establishes a Federal Acquisition Security Council. The council shall: (1) identify and recommend development of supply chain risk management standards, guidelines, and practices for assessing and developing mitigation strategies to address supply chain risks; and (2) develop a strategic plan for addressing supply chain risks posed by the acquisition of certain technology and equipment (covered articles). (Sec. 203) The bill sets forth standards for executive agencies in assessing supply chain risks and extends to such agencies authorities for mitigating supply chain risks in the procurement of covered articles. (Sec. 204) The bill adds agency responsibilities relating to assessing and avoiding, mitigating, transferring, or accepting supply chain risks and complying with exclusion and removal orders.
  10. Transcript of Tony Barilla on American-Midwest News Nevada GOP Senate Candidate: Finding Solutions and Giving Nevadans Back Their Land BY: Lucas Wheeler LAS VEGAS, NV - The Senate race in Nevada has been very close and hard-fought this election cycle, as per usual. In one of the most purple states of this nation, a strenuous contest emerges every election cycle: who will win the state's votes for President, Senator, and Representatives? This year, the frontrunner in the Senate race is Tony Barilla, a Republican who looks to flip a Democratic seat. We sat down with Mr. Barilla for a short interview session, talking about his campaign and the issues surrounding it. Nevada is one of the races that will decide control of the Senate. How are things going for you? We’re trying to run a different kind of campaign, one that’s about solutions and not about partisan talking points. Our internal polls shows that it’s working - we’re attracting support not just from conservatives, but from moderates and even from people who normally vote for the Democrats. What are some differences in politics out in Nevada, that our viewers here in the Midwest might not know about? One of the biggest differences is who owns the land. Your viewers in the Midwest might be shocked to learn that the federal government owns most of the land in the western United States. In Nevada, 85% of the land is owned by the federal government. Only a very small percentage of this is national parks, national monuments, military bases, or other stuff you might think of when you think of federal land. Most of it is just normal land that sits there, mostly unused, because the federal government has no idea what to do with it. Part of my campaign is to sell that land, so it can be put to good use. Such as? I’d like to see entrepreneurs buy some land and use it to test self-driving cars. I’d like to see energy companies buy some land and use it to build solar panels that generate green energy. I’d like to see nature groups buy land and turn it into wildlife refuges. I’d like to see state governments buy some land and turn it into additional state parks where people can camp and have fun. Above all, I want to see this land start generating economic value instead of just sitting around. And I’m sure there are people out there who have other good ideas that I can’t even think of. That’s part of the point of getting this land out of the federal government’s hand, because the federal government isn’t good at creative thinking. What about immigration? That’s a big issue out west, right? Absolutely. Nevada is a state that historically welcomes newcomers. Not only do we get a lot of immigrants from other countries, even our American-born population has a lot of people who moved here from other states to get a fresh start. A lot of our industries, like casinos and restaurants, just wouldn’t work without immigrants. But Nevadans are common sense people, they understand that not all immigrants are the same. That’s why my immigration policy is based on the idea that there are good immigrants and bad immigrants. The good immigrants are people who come to this country, follow the laws, and work hard. The bad immigrants are people who come to this country and commit crimes or join gangs. My policy is to roll out the red carpet for the good immigrants, and make it easier to deport the bad immigrants. Aren’t you worried your immigration policy is confusing? No. My policy is the policy that everyone would come up with if they sat down and devised an immigration policy based on logic instead of partisan politics. It makes sense that since our economy needs immigrants, we should make it easier to move here legally, especially for people with in-demand job skills and education. It makes sense that since we already have enough home-grown criminals, we don’t need criminals from other countries too. The politicians who should be worried about confusing the voters are politicians whose policies are not based on logic. As Nevada looks to send another Republican to the Senate, the nation can look forward to an interesting and novel Senator joining the ranks of the Senate Majority.
  11. Senator Madison, with thanks to Representative Lesko, introduced the following bill: AN ACT To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to conduct a threat and operational analysis of ports of entry, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “United States Ports of Entry Threat and Operational Review Act”. SEC. 2. PORTS OF ENTRY THREAT AND OPERATIONAL ANALYSIS. (a) In General.— (1) REQUIREMENT.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Homeland Security, acting through the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, shall submit to the Committee on Homeland Security and the Committee on Ways and Means of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs and the Committee on Finance of the Senate a threat and operational analysis of ports of entry. (2) CONTENTS.—The threat and operational analysis required under paragraph (1) shall include an assessment of the following: (A) Current and potential threats posed by individuals and organized groups seeking— (i) to exploit security vulnerabilities at ports of entry; or (ii) to unlawfully enter the United States through such ports of entry. (B) Methods and pathways used to exploit security vulnerabilities at ports of entry. (C) Improvements needed at ports of entry to prevent the unlawful movement of people, illicit drugs, and other contraband across the borders of the United States. (D) Improvements needed to enhance travel and trade facilitation and reduce wait times at ports of entry, including— (i) security vulnerabilities associated with prolonged wait times; (ii) current technology at ports of entry that can be adapted to handle more volume, increase efficiency, and improve accuracy of detection efforts; and (iii) infrastructure additions and upgrades. (E) Processes conducted at ports of entry that do not require law enforcement training and could be— (i) filled with— (I) non-law enforcement staff; or (II) the private sector, for processes or activities determined to not be inherently governmental (as such term is defined in section 5 of the Federal Activities Inventory Reform Act of 1998 (Public Law 105–270)); or (ii) automated. (3) ANALYSIS REQUIREMENTS.—In compiling the threat and operational analysis required under paragraph (1), the Secretary of Homeland Security, acting through the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, shall consider and examine the following: (A) Personnel needs, including K–9 Units, and estimated costs, at each port of entry, including such needs and challenges associated with recruitment and hiring. (B) Technology needs, including radiation portal monitors and non-intrusive inspection technology, and estimated costs at each port of entry. (C) Infrastructure needs and estimated costs at each port of entry. (b) Ports Of Entry Strategy And Implementation Plan.— (1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 270 days after the submission of the threat and operational analysis required under subsection (a) and every 5 years thereafter for 10 years, the Secretary of Homeland Security, acting through the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), shall provide to the Committee on Homeland Security and the Committee on Ways and Means of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs and the Committee on Finance of the Senate a ports of entry strategy and implementation plan. (2) CONTENTS.—The ports of entry strategy and implementation plan required under paragraph (1) shall include a consideration of the following: (A) The ports of entry threat and operational analysis required under subsection (a), with an emphasis on efforts to mitigate threats and challenges identified in such analysis. (B) Efforts to reduce wait times at ports of entry and standards against which the effectiveness of such efforts may be determined. (C) Efforts to prevent the unlawful movement of people, illicit drugs, and other contraband across the borders of the United States at the earliest possible point at ports of entry and standards against which the effectiveness of such efforts may be determined. (D) Efforts to focus intelligence collection and information analysis to disrupt transnational criminal organizations attempting to exploit vulnerabilities at ports of entry and standards against which the effectiveness of such efforts may be determined. (E) Efforts to verify that any new port of entry technology acquisition can be operationally integrated with existing technologies in use by the Department of Homeland Security. (F) Lessons learned from reports on the business transformation initiative under section 802(i)(1) of the Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act of 2015 (Public Law 114–125). (G) CBP staffing requirements for all ports of entry. (H) Efforts to identify and detect fraudulent documents at ports of entry and standards against which the effectiveness of such efforts may be determined. (I) Efforts to prevent, detect, investigate, and mitigate corruption at ports of entry and standards against which the effectiveness of such efforts may be determined. (c) Ports Of Entry Described.—In this section, the term “ports of entry” means United States air, land, and sea ports of entry. PES: (Sec. 2) This bill directs U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to submit to the congressional homeland security and tax committees a threat and operational analysis of U.S. air, land, and sea ports of entry. Such analysis shall include an assessment of: -current and potential threats posed by individuals and organized groups seeking to exploit security vulnerabilities at ports of entry or to unlawfully enter the United States through such ports of entry; -methods and pathways used to exploit security vulnerabilities at ports of entry; -improvements needed at ports of entry to prevent the unlawful movement of people, illicit drugs, and other contraband across U.S. borders; -improvements needed to enhance travel and trade facilitation and reduce wait times at ports of entry; and -processes conducted at ports of entry that do not require law enforcement training and could be filled with non-law enforcement staff or by the private sector or be automated. In compiling such analysis, CBP shall consider and examine: (1) personnel needs, including K-9 units, and estimated costs, at each port of entry; (2) technology needs, including radiation portal monitors and non-intrusive inspection technology, and estimated costs at each port of entry; and (3) infrastructure needs and estimated costs at each port of entry. CBP shall, at specified intervals, provide to the committees a ports of entry strategy and implementation plan.
  12. Senator Madison, with thanks to Representative Smith, introduced the following bill: AN ACT To extend certain authorities relating to United States efforts to combat HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria globally, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “PEPFAR Extension Act of 2018”. SEC. 2. INSPECTORS GENERAL AND ANNUAL STUDY. Section 101 of the United States Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Act of 2003 (22 U.S.C. 7611) is amended— (1) in subsection (f)(1)— (A) in subparagraph (A), by striking “2018” and inserting “2023”; and (B) in subparagraph (C)(iv)— (i) by striking “four” and inserting “nine”; and (ii) by striking “2018” and inserting “2023”; and (2) in subsection (g)— (A) in paragraph (1), by striking “2019” and inserting “2024”; and (B) in paragraph (2)— (i) in the heading, by striking “2018” and inserting “2024”; and (ii) by striking “September 30, 2018” and inserting “September 30, 2024”. SEC. 3. PARTICIPATION IN THE GLOBAL FUND TO FIGHT AIDS, TUBERCULOSIS, AND MALARIA. Section 202(d) of the United States Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Act of 2003 (22 U.S.C. 7622(d)) is amended— (1) in paragraph (4)— (A) in subparagraph (A)— (i) in clause (i), by striking “fiscal years 2009 through 2018” and inserting “fiscal years 2004 through 2023”; (ii) in clause (ii), by striking “2018” and inserting “2023”; and (iii) by striking clause (vi); and (B) in subparagraph (B)— (i) by striking clause (ii); (ii) by redesignating clauses (iii) and (iv) as clauses (ii) and (iii), respectively; (iii) in clause (ii) (as redesignated by clause (ii) of this subparagraph)— (I) in the first sentence, by adding at the end before the period the following: “or section 104B or 104C of such Act”; and (II) in the second sentence, by striking “for HIV/AIDS assistance”; and (iv) in clause (iii) (as redesignated by clause (ii) of this subparagraph), by striking “2018” and inserting “2023”; and (2) in paragraph (5), by striking “2018” and inserting “2023”. SEC. 4. ALLOCATION OF FUNDS. Section 403 of the United States Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Act of 2003 (22 U.S.C. 7673) is amended— (1) in subsection (b), by striking “2018” and inserting “2023”; and (2) in subsection (c), in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by striking “2018” and inserting “2023”. PES: This bill amends the United States Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Act of 2003 to extend certain provisions related to the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), a government initiative addressing the global HIV/AIDS epidemic. Specifically, the bill extends through FY2023 provisions that: -require the Inspectors General of the Department of State and the U.S. Agency for Global Media, jointly with the Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Agency for International Development, to coordinate and conduct oversight of PEPFAR programs, -limit U.S. contributions to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria to 33% of funds contributed from all sources, require that certain fund contributions be withheld under specified circumstances, such as if funds were previously used to assist a country that has repeatedly supported acts of international terrorism, and -require that more than half of the PEPFAR budget be allocated for specified HIV/AIDS treatment and care. The bill also extends through FY2024 annual reporting requirements relating to HIV/AIDS treatment providers and costs.
  13. Senator Madison, with thanks to Rep. Chabot, introduced the following bill: An ACT To direct the Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office, in consultation with the Administrator of the Small Business Administration, to study and provide recommendations to promote the participation of women, minorities, and veterans in entrepreneurship activities and the patent system, to extend by 8 years the Patent and Trademark Office’s authority to set the amounts for the fees it charges, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Study of Underrepresented Classes Chasing Engineering and Science Success Act of 2018” or the “SUCCESS Act”. SEC. 2. FINDINGS; SENSE OF CONGRESS. (a) Findings.—Congress finds the following: (1) Patents and other forms of intellectual property are important engines of innovation, invention, and economic growth. (2) Many innovative small businesses, which create over 20 percent of the total number of new jobs created in the United States each year, depend on patent protections to commercialize new technologies. (3) Universities and their industry partners also rely on patent protections to transfer innovative new technologies from the laboratory or classroom to commercial use. (4) Recent studies have shown that there is a significant gap in the number of patents applied for and obtained by women and minorities. (b) Sense Of Congress.—It is the sense of Congress that the United States has the responsibility to work with the private sector to close the gap in the number of patents applied for and obtained by women and minorities to harness the maximum innovative potential and continue to promote United States leadership in the global economy. SEC. 3. REPORT. (a) Study.—The Director, in consultation with the Administrator and any other head of an appropriate agency, shall conduct a study that— (1) identifies publicly available data on the number of patents annually applied for and obtained by, and the benefits of increasing the number of patents applied for and obtained by women, minorities, and veterans and small businesses owned by women, minorities, and veterans; and (2) provides legislative recommendations for how to— (A) promote the participation of women, minorities, and veterans in entrepreneurship activities; and (B) increase the number of women, minorities, and veterans who apply for and obtain patents. (b) Report.—Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Director shall submit to the Committees on the Judiciary and Small Business of the House of Representatives and the Committees on the Judiciary and Small Business and Entrepreneurship of the Senate a report on the results of the study conducted under subsection (a). SEC. 4. EXTENSION OF FEE-SETTING AUTHORITY. Section 10(i)(2) of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act (Public Law 112–29; 125 Stat. 319; 35 U.S.C. 41 note) is amended by striking “7-year” and inserting “15-year”. SEC. 5. DEFINITIONS. In this Act: (1) ADMINISTRATOR.—The term “Administrator” means the Administrator of the Small Business Administration. (2) AGENCY.—The term “agency” means a department, agency, or instrumentality of the United States Government. (3) DIRECTOR.—The term “Director” means the Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office. PES: (Sec. 3) This bill directs the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) to study and report to Congress on the number of patents applied for and obtained: (1) by women, minorities, and veterans; and (2) by small businesses owned by women, minorities, and veterans. The USPTO must provide legislative recommendations to increase the number of women, minorities, and veterans who participate in entrepreneurship activities and apply for patents. (Sec. 4) Additionally, the bill amends the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act to extend for eight years the authority of the USPTO to set and adjust patent fees.
  14. Character Name: Declan James Nation: United States Party: Democrat Home State: Massachusetts Home County: Suffolk County, Massachuessetts Home Media Market: Boston-Springfield, MA Previous Job: Central Intelligence Agency: Field Operative: February 1st 2000 - March 5th 2005 South America Station Chief: March 6th 2005 - June 10th 2006 Middle East Station Chief: June 11th 2006 - February 24th 2008 Moscow Station Chief: February 25th 2008 - April 3rd 2010 Director of the National Clandestine Service: April 4th 2010 - January 1st 2011 Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency: January 2nd 2011 - December 31st 2014 United States Senate: Chief of Staff for Senator Christina Tillman: January 1st 2015 - December 31st 2016Date of Birth: November 21, 1976Race / Ethnicity: WhiteReligion: CatholicWealth: Upper ClassGender: MaleSexuality: StraightAre you married?: Yes Which class of Senate seat is the one you're choosing? (Use this to help): N/AHow many children do you have?: 4
  15. Character Name: Brady Callahan Nation: United States Party: Republican Home State: Texas Home County: Houston Home Media Market: Houston, TX Previous Job: JournalistDate of Birth: July 27, 1982Race / Ethnicity: WhiteReligion: CatholicWealth: Upper ClassGender: MaleSexuality: HeterosexualAre you married?: Yes Which class of Senate seat is the one you're choosing? (Use this to help): N/AHow many children do you have?: 5
  16. Top Headlines Democrats hold lead in Presidential election (NATN) Republicans predicted to maintain majority in Congress (AMNC) Tillman Wins White House; GOP Keeps Congress (AMNC) Obama Backs President of Turkey During Coup Attempt (WNMN)
  17. OOC: Please also include the text of the article in the post per a new game policy change. In the future the site will automatically delete attached files/images and I don't want the article lost. I do like the formatting of the pdf, so feel free to still upload the files for people to choose which format they prefer. Thank you.
  18. Game Schedule 2016: 7/6/19 - 8/26/19 2017: 8/29/19 - 10/27/19 2018: 10/30/19 - 1/6/20 2019: 1/9/20 - 3/8/20 2020: 3/11/20 - 5/10/20 115th Congress (2017-2018) September 1: Congress Opens December 13: Congress Adjourns 116th Congress (2019-2020) January 10: Congress Opens April 25: Congress Adjourns 2018 Election Schedule (Senate Class I) August 31: Mid-session (4 hours) September 7: Mid-session (4 hours) September 14: Mid-session (4 hours) September 21: Mid-session (4 hours) September 28: Mid-session (4 hours) October 5: Mid-session (4 hours) October 12: Mid-session (4 hours) October 19: Mid-session (4 hours) October 26: Mid-session (4 hours) November 2: Mid-session (4 hours) November 9: Mid-session (4 hours) November 16: Mid-session (4 hours) November 23: Mid-session (4 hours) November 30: Mid-session (4 hours) December 5: Senate Filing Deadline (No campaigning) December 7: Senate Primary (24 hours, if necessary) December 10: Turn 1 (20 hours) December 13: Turn 2 (20 hours) December 16: Turn 3 (20 hours) December 19: Turn 4 (20 hours) December 22: Turn 5 (20 hours) December 28: Election Day Results
  19. Bruce

    Player Warchests

    Player Finances Player Character Income Expenditures Cash On Hand ADG Anthony Granata (R-IL) $0 $159,500,000 $820,000 Brady Adam Bishop (R-IA) $1,590,000 Dean Tyler (R-PA) $0 $31,810,000 $0 Chuck Roy Jim Coaver (NH) $2,620,397 Chuck Roy (R-NH) $0 DTMvikings Harvey Ross (R-NC) $3,480,000 $0 $80,300,000 Nubbie Perry Driscoll (R-NV) $31,360,000 Pinnacle Bill Bloom (R-CO) $3,650,000 $54,100,000 $0 Grant Pinnacle (R-AR) $30,000,000 Ryan Robert Tillman (R-LA) $3,390,000 Sheridan Tony Barilla (R-NV) $0 $65,520,000 $5,850,000 John Karst (R-AK) $7,470,000 Steven Andrews Steven Andrews (R-AR) $0 Adam Benson (R-UT) $46,750,000 $104,040,000 $22,840,000 SWMissourian Jackson Freeman (IL) $2,336,906 $2,765,876 Michael Madison (R-MO) $18,570,000 $42,970,000 $59,350,000 TexAgRepublican Kyle Fitzgerald (R-TX) $11,830,000 Tuna Wayne Noble (R-TX) $0 William Southard William Southard (R-OH) $0 NPC Martin Morse (R-IL) $13,000,000 $22,080,000 $2,260,000 Piper Valentine (R-AR) $10,000,000 $86,230,000 $276,000 Anne Whitaker (R-NH) $0 $6,000,000 $3,834,000 Recks Ted Frederickson (CO) $2,884,176 NPC Parker Porter (D-MO) $16,980,000 Jaydon Randall (D-NC) $11,930,000 Elijah Roman (D-PA) $14,690,000 Baccei John Richardson (D-ND) $0 Batman Wolfe Allenson (D-MO) $0 Barnabee James (D-IL) $0 $0 $2,100,000 Bolster John Mindy (D-MI) $0 Chris Robert Rhodes (NY) $909,930 $363,665 Christina Tillman (D-CA) $0 $207,267,000 $0 CWard Sean O'Rourke (MA) $4,462,643 Elise Thorne (D-AR) $8,517,000 $33,400,000 $727,000 Calvin Ward (D-MA) $2,000,000 $28,600,000 Dogslife Anthony Ludwig (MI) $1,275,308 $2,777,925 Robert Powell (D-CO) $0 $94,700,000 $0 Jack Silver Jack Silver (D-CA) $0 KDD Virginia Murray (D-NV) $2,000,000 $0 $410,000 Camille Pronovost (D-MT) $0 Michael Connor Jamison (D-VA) $0 Mike Jordan Mike Jordan (D-NY) $0 Randall Madeline Hayden (D-CT) $0 $0 $1,670,000 Rusty Russ Josh Denzler (IL) $5,000,000 Tyler O'Malley (D-WI) $2,120,000 Sinan Tony Barba (D-MI) $0 Sovereign Hugo Ballard (D-FL) $7,920,000 Starro David Kenya (D-MD) $0 Vince Mallorie Manongalia (D-NH) $0 $6,000,000 $510,000 Joey Stallman (D-WV) $3,360,000 Winston Winston Stone (D-NM) $0
  20. 2016 Election Results Roundtable Hosted on Discord by @Dogslife and @SWMissourian with participation by @Chris and @ADG
  21. State Republican Democrat Result Alabama NPC NPC Republican Hold Alaska NPC NPC Republican Hold Arizona NPC NPC Republican Hold Arkansas NPC Elise Thorne Republican Hold California NPC NPC Democrat Hold Colorado Bill Bloom Robert Powell Democrat Hold Connecticut NPC NPC Democrat Hold Florida NPC NPC Republican Hold Georgia NPC NPC Republican Hold Hawaii NPC NPC Democrat Hold Idaho NPC NPC Republican Hold Illinois NPC Barnabee James Democrat Pickup Indiana NPC NPC Republican Hold Iowa NPC NPC Republican Hold Kansas NPC NPC Republican Hold Kentucky NPC NPC Republican Hold Louisiana NPC NPC Republican Hold Maryland NPC NPC Democrat Hold Missouri Michael Madison NPC Republican Hold Nevada Tony Barilla Virginia Murray Republican Pickup New Hampshire NPC Mallorie Manongalia Democrat Pickup New York NPC NPC Democrat Hold North Carolina Harvey Ross NPC Republican Hold North Dakota NPC NPC Republican Hold Ohio NPC NPC Republican Hold Oklahoma NPC NPC Republican Hold Oregon NPC NPC Democrat Hold Pennsylvania Dean Tyler NPC Republican Hold South Carolina NPC NPC Republican Hold South Dakota NPC NPC Republican Hold Utah NPC NPC Republican Hold Vermont NPC NPC Democrat Hold Washington NPC NPC Democrat Hold Wisconsin NPC NPC Republican Hold
  22. Sounds like the other person need to change there AV
  23. Character Name: Armatage Shawshank Nation: US Party: Democrat Home State: Arizona Home County: Santa Cruz Home Media Market: Phoenix-Tuscon, AZ Previous Job: US Navy Vice Admiral (VADM09)Date of Birth: January 23rd 1958 (58 years old)Race / Ethnicity: Caucasian Religion: ChristianWealth: Upper ClassGender: MaleSexuality: HomosexualAre you married?: Yes Dale Phillips-Shawshank 2014-Present Which class of Senate seat is the one you're choosing? (Use this to help): N/A How many children do you have?: 2 adopted Christian (11) and Marcus (9)
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